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Don't Forget to "Spring Forward" this Weekend!

by Amy McLeod Group

Exploring Salem Oregon: Cherry Blossom Theatre Festival

by Amy McLeod Group


Friday, March 8, 2019 - Sunday, March 10, 2019

Join us at the third-annual Cherry Blossom Theatre Festival for a three-day theatre extravaganza. Featuring the national one-act competition and nine workshops ranging in skill level from beginner to expert. All in downtown Salem!

Salem's Historic Grand Theatre
187 High St NE
Salem, OR 97301

503-485-4300 

https://www.facebook.com/events/665987743803422

Courtesy of Amy McLeod, The McLeod Group Network

Photo Credit: facebook.com

Top 10 Questions to Ask a Mortgage Lender: Do You Know Them All?

by Amy McLeod Group


What are the best questions to ask a mortgage lender before you lock in a home loan? If you want to find the very best mortgage for your needs, it pays to not automatically go with the very first lender you see.

“You need to shop around to make sure you’re getting the best interest rate and loan terms,” says Peggy Yee, supervising broker at Frankly Realtors, in Vienna, VA, who recommends that home buyers meet with at least three lenders before they pick.

So how do you compare and contrast your options effectively? Ask these 10 questions below to get a sense of who's right for you.

1. What types of home loans do you offer?

Some lenders offer a wide range of mortgage products, while others specialize in only one or two types of home loans. Finding a lender that offers the type of mortgage you need is a must. These are the most common types of home mortgages:

  • Fixed-rate loan: True to its name, a fixed-rate mortgage means that the interest rate you pay remains fixed at the same level throughout the life of your loan (typically 15 or 30 years).
  • Adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM): An ARM offers a low interest rate for an introductory period. After that period—typically two to five years—the rate becomes adjustable up to a certain limit, depending on market conditions.
  • FHA loan: Geared toward low-income home buyers, a Federal Housing Administration loan lets borrowers put down as little as 3% on a house.
  • VA loan: If you or your spouse serve or served in the military, you may qualify for a Veterans Affairs loan. Under this program, the VA guarantees the loan—reducing the risk to the lender—and allows you to finance up to 100% of the house's cost, so you won't have to come up with any money for a down payment.
  • USDA loan: Another type of government-backed mortgage, this loan is offered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Development in towns with populations of 10,000 or less. USDA loan borrowers can have down payments as low as 0%.
  • Jumbo loan: If you live in a pricey housing market, you may end up with a jumbo loan—a mortgage that's above the limits for government-sponsored loans. In most parts of the country, that means loans over $417,000; in areas where the cost of living is extremely high (e.g., Manhattan and San Francisco), the threshold jumps to $625,000.

2. What type of mortgage is best for me?

A mortgage lender should be able to answer this question once you’ve completed a loan application and the lender takes stock of your employment, income, assets, credit, debt, expenses, down payment, and other information about your finances.

3. What are your closing costs?

For home buyers, closing costs—the fees paid to a lender and other third parties that help facilitate the sale of a home—typically run about 3% to 4% of a home’s sales price. So on a $250,000 home, your closing costs as a buyer would amount from $7,500 to $10,000. The good news is some closing costs are negotiable: attorney fees, commission rates, recording costs, and messenger fees.

Your best approach is to submit loan applications with several lenders so that you can receive good-faith estimates(GFEs), which contain an itemized list of a lender’s closing fees.

4. How much time do you need to complete a mortgage?

One recent study found that closing times take, on average, 50 days. But, if you’re buying in a hot housing market, you may need to find a lender who can turn around a mortgage quickly—30 days or less.

The caveat: Some types of loans often take longer to process. The entire FHA loan process, for example, may take 30 to 60 days from the time you apply for the loan to the day you close, since the house must pass an inspection conducted by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. And if the house requires certain repairs in order to pass inspection, they must be completed before the sale can go through.

5. Do you do underwriting in-house?

Underwriting—the process in which mortgage lenders verify your assets to get a home loan, check your credit score, and review your home appraisal—can last as little as two to three days, but typically takes over a week to finish. All loans must go through underwriting before the lender can issue you the funds for a home purchase.

Some lenders do underwriting in-house, while others farm out to third-party underwriters. Though there are plenty of good lenders that outsource their underwriting, finding lenders that do theirs in-house could help speed up the process, since the underwriter would have direct access to your loan officer. (Communication between a loan officer and an outside underwriter might take longer.)

6. What documents do I need?

Proof of income and assets, personal identification, and information about your credit history are the big three. It can be a lot of paperwork, so start now by getting your paperwork in order.

7. Do you participate in any down payment assistance programs?

Need help making a down payment? There are many down payment assistance programs across the country which can help. One study found that buyers who use down payment assistance programs save an average of $17,766. The challenge, though, is not all mortgage lenders participate in these programs—but if you need down payment assistance to buy a house, you’ll need to find a lender that does.

8. Do you charge for an interest rate lock?

mortgage rate lock is a commitment by a lender to give you a home loan at a specific interest rate, provided you close on your home in a certain period of time. This rate lock offers protection against fluctuating interest rates—useful considering that even a quarter of a percentage point can take a huge bite out of your housing budget over time.

Most lenders will offer a 30-day rate lock at no charge to you, but some lenders do charge for rate locks. This fee can be as high as 1% of your total loan amount. On a $300,000 mortgage, that means paying up to $3,000 to secure your rate—that’s not chump change.

9. Who will be the title and escrow agency or attorney?

You don’t have to leave the selection of the title company up to the lender. See how much your mortgage lender’s recommendation will cost, then shop around and see if you can save any money.

You can do the same for an escrow agency and attorney.

10. How do you communicate with your clients?

A great mortgage lender will stay in close contact with you, giving you updates on key steps in the mortgage approval process (e.g., the home appraisal and underwriting), says Yee. Additionally, you want to find a lender that you could reach easily when you have questions. Some loan officers work only during regular business hours, Monday through Friday, which can be a big disadvantage if you need help on a weekend.

Let The McLeod Group Network assist you in finding your new home! 971.208.5093 or admin@mgnrealtors.com 

By: Realtor.com, Craig Donofrio 


As you've no doubt heard, the U.S. tax code got a major overhaul with the new Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. So what does that mean for the return you're filing right about now? It means you may not be able to take some deductions from the old tax code that saved you major bucks in the past. Ouch!

But it's not quite as bad as you might think. Many tax breaks haven't disappeared completely; rather they've just morphed a bit, redefining who qualifies and for how much. To clue you in to these new rules, here's a rundown of five major tax breaks that have changed this filing year, and who still qualifies for them.

 
 
 

1. Home office tax deduction

You may have heard a rumor that the home office tax deduction went the way of the dodo. Yes, the deduction is gone for W-2 employees of companies who work in a home office on the occasional Friday.

"For non-self-employed people, the home office deduction is going away entirely," says Eric Bronnenkant, certified public accountant, certified financial planner, and Betterment's head of tax.

The loophole: If you're self-employed full time, this deduction lives on. Here's more info on how to take a home office tax deduction.

2. Unlimited property tax

One of the biggest changes for homeowners in the new tax bill is the cap on deducting property taxes.

"Before, regardless of the amount, all property taxes were tax-deductible," explains Bronnenkant. Yet this season, "the maximum you can deduct is $10,000, and that includes state and local income tax, property tax, and sales tax."

So if you pay more than $10,000 a year between your state and local income taxes, property tax, and sales tax, anything exceeding that amount is no longer deductible. This is something to keep in mind as homeowners consider tax benefits of their current or future home.

The loophole: "It is worth noting that this limit applies to a taxpayer’s primary, and in some cases secondary, residence," says Bill Abel, tax manager of Sensiba San Filippo in Boulder, CO. "But it may not apply to rental real estate property."

Why? The $10,000 overall tax limit is applied on Schedule A as an itemized deduction, which would have no bearing on the tax deduction for a rental property on Schedule E. So if you're a landlord, your deduction could edge past that $10,000 limit; make sure to max it out!

3. Moving expenses

If you moved in 2017, lucky you: You are the last to take advantage of the ability to deduct your moving expenses.

The loophole: Active members of the armed forces who moved (or move) after 2017 can still take this deduction, according to Patrick Leddy, a tax partner at Farmand, Farmand, and Farmand.

4. Mortgage interest

One major change for homeowners who purchased a house after Dec. 15, 2017, is that they will be allowed to deduct the interest on no more than $750,000 of acquisition debt—that's a loan used to buy, build, or improve a main or secondary home, says Abel. This is in contrast to the $1,000,000 limit on acquisition debt, which still applies to existing loans incurred on or before Dec. 15, 2017.

The loophole: Homeowners who refinance their debt that existed on or before Dec. 15, 2017, are generally allowed to maintain their $1,000,000 limit from the original mortgage.

5. Interest on a home equity loan

A home equity loan is money you borrow using your home as collateral. This "second mortgage" (because it's in addition to your original home loan) often takes the form of a home equity loan or home equity line of credit. Traditionally, the interest on these loans could be deducted up to $100,000 for married joint filers and $50,000 for individuals. And you could use that money to pay for anything—college tuition, a wedding, you name it.

But now, home equity loan interest is deductible only if it's used for one purpose: to "buy, build, or improve" your home, according to the IRS. So if you're dying to update your kitchen or add a half-bath, you'll get a tax break from Uncle Sam. But if you want to tap your home equity to go to grad school, well, that's on you.

More bad news: Unlike the mortgage interest deduction—where loans taken before Dec. 15, 2018, could be grandfathered into the old laws—home equity loans have no such exemption. People with existing HELOC debt take the hit just like homeowners applying for one now.

The loophole: To reclaim this deduction, you could refinance your second mortgage and your first into a new mortgage that lumps together both debts. This essentially turns your HELOC into a regular mortgage, which means that you can deduct that interest. Just remember that refinancing can be costly, and that this new loan will be subject to the new, smaller limits on deducting mortgage interest—$750,000.

Worried about losing all of these deductions? Don't freak out!

Though the new tax plan is drastically changing how most people will file their taxes, it doesn't necessarily mean that you will end up owing more. Deductions may be dropping, but so are the tax rates for most income groups. And the standard deduction grew to $24,000 for a married couple filing jointly. So, it may all balance out.

Contact The McLeod Group Network at 971.208.5093 or admin@mgnrealtors.com for all your Real Estate needs! 

By: Realtor.com, Margaret Heidenry 

 

Exploring Salem Oregon: Jurassic Quest

by Amy McLeod Group


Friday, March 1, 2019 - 3:00 PM to 8:00 PM
Saturday, March 2, 2019 - 9:00 AM to 8:00 PM
Sunday, March 3, 2019 - 9:00 AM to 8:00 PM

Join us for Jurassic Quest - the largest and most realistic dinosaur event in North America!  Jurassic Quest features dinosaur rides, fossil digging, a dino petting zoo, activities, and over 80 dinosaurs to check out!  Tickets are $20 to $36.

Oregon State Fairgrounds
2330 17th St. NE
Salem, OR 97301

jurassicquest.com

(936) 588-3332

Event Website and Ticket Sales

Courtesy of Amy McLeod, The McLeod Group Network

Photo Credit: jurassicquest.com

U.S. Pending Home Sales Rose 4.6% in January

by Amy McLeod Group


WASHINGTON—The number of existing homes that went under contract in the U.S. rose strongly in January, a sign of improvement for the housing market at the start of the year.

An index measuring pending home sales—a gauge of purchases before they become final—rose 4.6% to a seasonally adjusted reading of 103.2 in January, the National Association of Realtors said Wednesday.

 
 
 

Economists surveyed by The Wall Street Journal had predicted a 0.8% increase in January’s sales. The index was down 2.3% in January from a year earlier.

December’s reading was revised slightly lower, to 98.7 from an initial 99.0.

Pending sales offer a forecast of the housing market because they measure purchases at the time a contract is signed rather than at closing. Contracts typically take weeks to become final, and some are ultimately canceled.

“A change in Federal Reserve policy and the reopening of the government were very beneficial to the market,” said Lawrence Yun, the trade group’s chief economist.

He added that rising incomes, a strong labor market and steady mortgage rates should help January’s positive trend to continue.

Still, the NAR reported earlier this month that its more closely watched index—final sales of existing homes, which measure purchases after closing—fell in January.

News Corp, owner of The Wall Street Journal, also operates Realtor.com under license from the National Association of Realtors.

Contact The McLeod Group Network at 971.208.5093 or admin@mgnrealtors.com for all your Real Estate needs! 

By: Realtor.com,  

The Home Appraisal Process: What to Expect as a Buyer

by Amy McLeod Group


The home appraisal process is just a formality when buying real estate, right? You've found the house you love and put in a good offer, and it was accepted! It's time to break out the Dom Pérignon White Gold? Sorry, not yet.

If you've applied for a mortgage, your home-to-be still has to undergo a comprehensive appraisal of its worth—and an unfavorable home appraisal can kill a real estate deal. Yikes! It can be a nerve-racking ordeal, but it's actually good for you. Allow us to demystify the process.

Appraisals estimate a home's value with fresh eyes

Just because you and the sellers have agreed on a price doesn't mean it's a done deal—your lender needs to be on board, too. After all, it's the lender's real estate investment as well. To get a mortgage, you'll need a home appraisal because the home serves as collateral for your lender. If for some reason you end up unable to make your mortgage payments, the lender will have to foreclose on your home, then sell the property to recoup its costs. So your mortgage lender will have to know the value of your home before handing over that large chunk of change.

While the home appraisal process is somewhat similar to getting comps—as you did to determine a fair price—the appraiser delves in deeper to determine the home's exact value.

An appraiser will investigate the condition, the square footage, location, and any additions or renovations. From there, he or she will appraise the home and determine its value.

An appraiser is trained to be unbiased, says Adam Wiener, founder of Aladdin Appraisal in Auburndale, MA.

“I don't care what anybody wants the home to be worth," he says. “As an appraiser, I'll give you the answer. You may not like it, but it's the answer."

Off-site, the appraiser may also evaluate the current real estate market in the neighborhood to help determine the value of the property.

Usually, the lender or financing organization will hire the appraiser. Because it's in the best interest of the lender to get a good home appraisal, the lender will have a list of reputable pros to appraise the home.

Whoever takes out the mortgage pays for the home appraisal, unless the contract specifies otherwise. Then the buyer pays the fee in the closing costs. If a seller is motivated, he may pay for the home appraisal himself to back his asking price, which benefits the buyer by reducing closing costs.

You'll get a copy of the home appraisal, too

An appraiser sets out to determine if the home is actually worth what you're planning to pay. You might be surprised by how little time that takes; the appraiser could be in and out of a home in 30 minutes, and that's not a reason to panic.

An appraiser doesn't have the same job as a home inspector, who examines every little detail. While they'll pay particular attention to problems with the foundation and roof, the home appraisal process includes noting the quality and condition of the appliances, plumbing, flooring, and electrical system. With data in hand, they make their final assessment and give their report to the lender. The mortgage company is then required by law to give a copy of the appraisal to you.

Appraisers work for your lender—not you

As the buyer, you'll be paying for the home appraisal. In most cases, the fee is wrapped into your closing costs and will set you back $300 to $400. However, just because you pay doesn't mean you're the client.

“My client is the lender, not the buyer," Wiener says. This ensures that appraisers remain ethical—in fact, it's a crime to coerce or put any pressure on an appraiser to hit a certain value. Appraisers must remain independent.

“Anything less, and public trust in the appraisal is lost," says Wiener.

They protect buyers from a bad deal

In essence, the home appraisal process is meant to protect you (and the lender) from a bad purchase. For instance: If the appraisal comes in higher than your asking price, it's generally fine. Sure, the sellers could decide they want more money and would rather put their home back on the market; but in most cases, the deal will go through as expected.

If your appraisal comes in lower than what you offered, this is where things get tricky: Your lender won't pony up more money than the appraised price. So if you and the sellers agree on $125,000 but the appraisal comes in at $105,000, it creates a $20,000 shortfall. What's a buyer to do? Read on.

A curveball appraisal isn't necessarily the end

If the appraisal process happens, your appraisal comes in low, and your contract with the seller was contingent on an appraisal, you could walk away and have your earnest money returned.

If you prefer to buy the home anyway (or waived your appraisal contingency), there are some other paths you can pursue:

  • Come up with the cash to cover the difference between the appraisal and offer price.
  • Ask the seller to cover the difference.
  • Challenge the appraisal, and pay for a second opinion.

Keep in mind, though, that your new report could come out identical. Also keep in mind that if you do choose to walk away, that's actually good news, although it may not seem like it at the time. Why? Because the appraisal kept you from paying too much for your home.

Once your appraisal is done, you're still not ready to close without another nerve-racking step called a home inspection.

Let's get together and find your dream home! Contact The McLeod Group Network at 971.208.5093 or admin@mgnrealtors.com. 

By: Realtor.com, Jamie Wiebe 

Exploring Salem Oregon: Rustic Roots Vintage Market

by Amy McLeod Group


Friday, February 22, 2019 - February 23, 2019

Come and check out the first ever Rustic Roots Vintage Market put on by Ammie’s Attic.  You will find all things shabby, farmhouse, rustic, and vintage inspired.  $5 admission.

Polk County Fairgrounds
520 S Pacific Hwy West
Rickreall, OR 97371

541-990-8571

Event Website

Courtesy of Amy McLeod, The McLeod Group Network

Photo Credit: travelsalem.com

What Is Escrow? How It Keeps Home Buyers and Sellers Safe

by Amy McLeod Group


What is escrow? In real estate, an escrow account is a secure holding area where important items (e.g., the earnest money check and contracts) are kept safe by an escrow company until the deal is closed and the house officially changes hands.

Escrow is also a contractual arrangement in which a third party—usually the escrow officer—maintains money and documents until the deal is done.

How escrow works

The escrow agent is a third party—perhaps someone from the real estate closing company, an attorney, or a title company agent (customs vary by state), says Andy Prasky, a real estate professional with Re/Max Advantage Plus in Twin Cities.

The third party is there to make sure everything during the transaction proceeds smoothly, including the transfers of money and documents. Escrow protects all the relevant parties in a real estate transaction by ensuring that no funds from your lender and property change hands until all conditions in the agreement have been met.

Along the way, proper documentation is filed with the escrow agent or the escrow company as each step toward closing is completed. Contingencies that might be part of the process could include home inspectionrepairs, and other tasks that need to be accomplished by the buyer or seller. And every time one of those steps is completed, the buyer or seller signs off with a contingency release form; then the transaction moves on to the next step (and one step closer to closing).

Once all conditions are met and the transaction is finalized, the money due to the sellers is transferred from your lender to them. Meanwhile an escrow officer clears (or records) the title, which means the buyer officially owns the home.

How much does escrow cost?

That varies—as well as whether the buyer or seller (or both) pays—with the fee for this real estate service typically totaling about 1% to 2% of the cost of the home.

The earnest money deposit

Earnest money—also known as an escrow deposit—is a dollar amount buyers put into an escrow account after a seller accepts their offer. The escrow company will hold onto that money for the duration of the transaction.

Another way to think of earnest money is as a "good-faith” deposit into an escrow account that will compensate the seller if the buyer breaches the contract and fails to close.

Can you borrow earnest money from your lender?

Earnest money can be borrowed from your lender, but there are certain rules involved. First-time buyers are most likely to need to go to their lender for their earnest money. Your lender will ultimately count your earnest money as part of the down payment on the house.

What is an escrow account?

When you make your monthly payment to your lender, part of it goes toward your mortgage and part of it goes into your escrow account for property taxes and insurance premiums such as homeowners insurance or mortgage insurance. When those bills are due, your lender will use the funds in your escrow account to pay them.

How escrow protects you

Escrow may seem like a pain, but here's how it can work in your favor. Let's say, for example, the buyer had a home inspection contingency and discovered that the roof needed repairs. The seller agrees to fix the roof. However, during the buyer's final walk-through, she finds that the roof hasn’t been repaired as expected. In this case, the seller won’t see a dime of the buyer’s money until the roof is fixed. Talk about a nice safeguard!

Sellers benefit from escrow, too: Let's say the buyers get cold feet at the last minute and bail on the transaction. This may be disappointing to the seller, but at the very least, buyers have typically ponied up a sizable chunk of change for their earnest money deposit. This money, often totaling 1% to 2% of the purchase price of a home, has been held in escrow. When buyers back out with no legitimate reason, they forfeit that money to the seller—a decent consolation for the sale's failure.

Escrow, in other words, is the equivalent of bumpers on cars, keeping everyone safe as they move forward in a real estate transaction. Odds are, no one's trying to swindle anyone. But isn't it nice to know that if something does go wrong, escrow is there to cushion the blow?

Contact The McLeod Group Network for all your Real Estate needs! 971.208.5093 or admin@mgnrealtors.com

By: Realtor.com, Cathie Ericson

Yankee Doodle! We Salute 9 Homes From America's Revolutionary Era

by Amy McLeod Group


American history is alive in the buildings that our forefathers—and mothers—left behind. To honor Presidents Day, we're highlighting nine homes built before and during the 
Revolutionary War.

Neoclassical, Georgian, and European inspiration was evident in the architectural preferences of the period. According to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the homes of well-heeled revolutionaries were ornate and generously adorned with symbols of patriotism and pride in their newly established country. The Colonial style matured and developed as the influences from Europe were reinterpreted and translated into a distinctly American style.

 
 
 

So as we ponder our past, peruse these historic homes from the Revolutionary War era that are available for sale right now, offering an opportunity to live in a piece of American history that even George Washington himself would approve of.

287 King St, Hiram ME 

Price: $399,000
John Watson House: This historic property, also known as the Intervale Farm, is the oldest in this town in southern Maine. The three-bedroom home sits on more than 27 acres, on land that includes a stretch of Saco River waterfront. Built just after the 
Revolutionary War ended, its Georgian style is pristine. There are symmetrical wings jutting out from the main structure and 18 prominent Palladian windows. The home has been carefully updated to provide modern conveniences, without sacrificing any of its historic charm.

Hiram, ME
Hiram, ME

realtor.com

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131 S. Benson Rd, Fairfield, CT 

Price: $749,900

Benson House: According to the listing details, the original home built on this property had the dubious distinction of being the second to be burned down by the British during the war. It was rebuilt in 1779, and has since served as a tavern and as the home of Captain Abraham Benson. The four-bedroom house has been in the same family since the 1800s, and sits on just under half an acre, festooned with lilacs, wisteria, a rock garden, and a pergola with stone columns. Indoors, the home features high ceilings, wide plank floors, and many ornate built-ins.

Fairfield, CT
Fairfield, CT

realtor.com

———

697 Middle Rd, Portsmouth, RI

Price: $679,900
Portsmouth Colonial: Built in 1750, this three-bedroom home has many modern amenities spread over its more than 2,800 square feet. Indoors, the home has wide pumpkin pine floors, four fireplaces, and the home's original wainscoting and chair rails. Outside, the mature landscaping includes specimen trees, lawns, gardens, and a stone terrace. The price also includes a half-acre lot zoned for new construction.

Portsmouth, RI
Portsmouth, RI

realtor.com

———

212 Bellvale Lakes Rd., Warwick, NY

Warwick, NY
Warwick, NY

realtor.com

Price: $595,000
New England Antique: This home has oodles of historic character, as well as updates that make it desirable to today's buyers. Located just 50 miles outside New York City, it's set on 5 acres of rolling grass and forest. The home consists of two separate structures joined together to create one large six-bedroom residence. Features from the part of the residence built in 1766 include huge fireplaces for cooking, hand-hewn stone mantels, wood beams, and irregular plank floors.

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1650 Lake Rd, Panton, VT

Price: $319,000
Lakeside Cape: Described as a "diamond in the rough," this three-bedroom Cape Cod has its own dairy barn. It was built in the late 1700s, overlooks Lake Champlain, and sits on 7.5 pristine acres in the Adirondacks. Wood floors with hand-forged nails, exposed beams, and hand-planed paneling make this home, which is registered with the Preservation Trust of Vermont, an authentic blast from the past.

Panton, VA
Panton, VT

realtor.com

———

525 Lewis Ln, Ambler, PA

Price: $7,999,000
George Washington's HQ: Dawesfield is a 22-acre estate dating back to 1736. The property includes a couple of three-story stone Colonial homes, three barns, several detached garages and sheds, a greenhouse, guesthouse, a three-hole 
golf course, and pool. The property's two homes were used by George Washington as his headquarters during the Revolutionary War. One seven-bedroom house has more than 5,800 square feet and the other five-bedroom home offers over 5,000 square feet. Included in the sale are historical documents and the bed George Washington slept in during his time there.

Ambler, PA
Ambler, PA

realtor.com

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201 Route 9W, Palisades, NY 

Price: $2,250,000
The Big House: Built in 1738, "The Big House" is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is one of the oldest in the area. The English Manor-style home was the location of a meeting between George Washington and General Lafayette during the Revolutionary War. On another occasion, Martha Washington visited the home. The four-bedroom home includes such period features as white pine paneling, period cabinetry, wide board floors, and a 
kitchen wing that is billed as potentially dating back to 1685.

Palisades, NY
Palisades, NY

realtor.com

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215 Orange St, Lancaster, PA 

Price: $1,100,000
James Buchanan Home: Built in 1709 by James Buchanan, who was to become the 15th president of the United States, this property later became the home of the Revolutionary War-era writer Christopher Marshall. These days, it's an upscale, modern residence with such upgrades as the custom red rose 
cabinets in the kitchen, a soaking tub in the main bathroom, and a professionally designed and landscaped courtyard with slate patio. The home's other high-tech upgrades include a sensor snowmelt system installed in the driveway and sidewalks, a security gate with camera, surround sound on the first floor, keyless locking, and more. Pretty presidential, if you ask us!

Lancaster, PA
Lancaster, PA

realtor.com

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28 Colonial Rd, White Plains, NY 

Price: $1,435,000
Notable Colonial: Notable for its past and present, this home from 1710 is a fully renovated love letter to centuries past. Featured in the December 2018 edition of House Beautiful, it was once the home of the 
Revolutionary War hero Benjamin Lyon, who cast a vote for the Declaration of Independence. Original features of the home have been carefully preserved, like the wide king's board wood floors, exposed wood beams, period moldings, and bricks from the 18th century. Infrastructure updates have brought this beautiful property into the 21st century and make it a cozy, stylish space for modern living.

White Plains, NY
White Plains, NY

realtor.com
 

Contact The McLeod Group Network for all your Real Estate needs! 971.208.5093 or admin@mgnrealtors.com

By: Realtor.com, Becky Bracken

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Contact Information

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The McLeod Group Network
Keller Williams Capital City
1900 Hines St SE #220
Salem OR 97302
971-208-5093
Fax: 971-599-5229

**Disclaimer: Amy McLeod, and her team, do not initiate, process, or service mortgages.  And provide this information only as a service.  You should confirm information here with your Licensed Mortgage Lender.