Real Estate Information Archive

Blog

Displaying blog entries 1-10 of 426

Exploring Salem Oregon: Gardening Class at Brooks Winery

by Amy McLeod Group


Join us for a day in the garden with our Master Gardener. Learn the principles of biodynamics. Barbara will also teach on integrative planting for soil development, water conservation and pest reduction. She will also discuss garden designs that reserve space for deer and other wildlife, while also protecting kitchen crops. At the conclusion of the class you'll be able to select produce to go and enjoy lunch and a glass of wine on our lower patio. $50.

Brooks Winery
21101 SE Cherry Blossom Lane
Amity, OR 97101

5034351278

Event Website

Courtesy of Amy McLeod, The McLeod Group Network

Photo Credit: travelsalem.com


You’ve lived in your home for years and haven't exactly been on top of regular maintenance tasks. Now, your windows are covered in plastic wrap to cut down on the cold drafts, your ceiling seems to be leaking, and those shrubs you planted to conceal a few small cracks in the foundation just aren’t cutting it anymore.

Hey, we’re not judging! But if you’re ready to put your home up for sale, know this: Buyers and their agents are going to zero in on all those things that need doing—as well as some things you hadn't even noticed yourself.

So why not get ahead of the curve by hiring a licensed home inspector who can pinpoint what needs fixing?

Of course, most sellers don’t get their homes inspected before listing them, because the buyer usually orders an inspection during escrow, says Marc Lyman, a Realtor® with Pacific Sotheby's International Realty in San Diego, CA. And who wants to pay for something twice?

But if you're willing to invest the time and money, a thorough inspection before listing your property can make it easier to price your home, manage repairs, and even help sell it faster—and for more money.

So what are the some of the reasons why a pre-listing inspection makes sense? Let's take a look.

It can save you if you've neglected home maintenance

If you have a busy life—or maybe even if you don't—chances are that obsessing over regular home maintenance might not be your No. 1 priority during downtime. Trouble is, letting painting, roof repairs, and other routine chores slide can lead to bigger issues down the road, says Chicago-based Frank Lesh, ambassador for the American Society of Home Inspectors.

“In a lot of cases, people think, ‘I've been here for 30 years; the house is fine. There's nothing wrong with it,’" he says. "But they’re looking at it with rose-colored glasses.”

Instead of worrying what a buyer’s inspector will uncover—and which could potentially kill the sale—be proactive with a pre-listing inspection, Lesh says. This way, rather than being blindsided, you can then decide whether to make the necessary repairs or to account for that deferred maintenance by reducing the list price. Which leads us to…

You can make more a bigger profit on your sale

Sure, a home inspection that you don't have to do is going to cost money. (An inspection for a 1,200- to 1,500-square-foot house in an average market, for instance, will cost between $350 and $600, Lesh says.) But as the saying goes: Sometimes you have to spend money to make money.

After all, if you invest a little more to repair and spruce up anything the pre-inspection reveals, you can justify listing your home at a higher price, Lyman says. Plus, he adds, in most states, home improvement repairs you carry out before selling your house are deductible from the profit you make from the sale.

Sometimes, just knowing that a pro has given the house a proper once-over can persuade a buyer to make a bid (assuming that you actually follow the inspector’s recommendations).

“It minimizes surprises for a buyer, and can give a buyer more confidence in the property," Lyman says.

You won't have to scramble to fix things at the last minute

Once a buyer’s inspector submits a report, sellers are usually faced with two choices: If problems are found with the house, they can then either slash money from the sale price, or opt to carry out repairs before the closing date. That often leaves sellers in the lurch, having to get work done pronto—and sometimes paying a premium for the rush work.

After a pre-listing inspection, sellers can research contractors and make the necessary repairs within a time frame of their choosing, so that everything is ready before potential buyers even visit the property.

It'll minimize back-and-forth negotiation

Buyers often use their home inspection as leverage, asking the seller (that's you!) for steep discounts based on what their inspector’s report reveals. Not surprisingly, the buyer’s inspection is often where the deal falls apart.

If you’ve already uncovered the issues and addressed them, you can raise the price of your home accordingly, Lyman says. “That gives the buyer less leverage in the request for repair process,” he explains.

Also, in red-hot markets where multiple bids come fast and furious, there's always a chance that buyers might accept your pre-listing inspection without insisting on doing their own. This can make for a quicker sale, Lesh says.

But make sure a pre-inspection doesn’t work against you

As advantageous as a pre-inspection can be, don’t forget that the inspector’s report could be a double-edged sword: Once you know about a problem, you can’t ignore it, Lyman says.

Sellers are legally obligated to disclose any problems that a home inspection unearths.

“For sellers unwilling to do repairs, their own inspection could be used as leverage to negotiate on price and in the request-for-repair process,” he says.

Before committing to a pre-inspection, find out what other sellers in your area are doing. Your agent can help guide you on whether it's necessary to sell for more, or if there's a better—and more affordable—strategy for getting your home sold.

Looking to sell your home? Contact The McLeod Group Network to learn how much your home is worth in today's market!  971.208.5093 or [email protected].

By: Realtor.com, Wendy Helfenbaum

The Ultimate Guide to Bathroom Sinks: Which Type Is Right for You?

by Amy McLeod Group


There are many styles of bathroom sinks, and each has its particular pros and cons—including its price. Since this seemingly simple fixture can have such a big impact on how a bathroom functions and looks, you may be wondering: What's the best basin for our home?

That depends, of course, on your sense of style, budget, how many toiletries you like to stash on your counter, and plenty of other factors. "There are a large number of sinks that can be used in the bathroom, and in many cases, it’s just a question of style and preference," says Sarah Fishburne, director of trend and design at Home Depot. "But in a few cases, you may definitely benefit from one style over another. For instance, a square sink tends to look more updated and offer a larger wash area that some might want. But others will want to have as much counter space as possible, making round and oval sinks a better choice."

–– ADVERTISEMENT ––
 

So, in our latest edition of the Dream Bathroom Remodeling Guide, we delve into the various types of bathroom sinks and how to figure out which one's right for you.

Pedestal sinks

A pedestal sink consists of a wall-hung basin with a pedestal that covers the plumbing.

Cost: $50 to $600

Pros: This is the most common type of bathroom sink, which means that they are easy to find, says James Walsh, vice president of American Standard china ware and bathing. Their sleek, sophisticated lines can also appear to enlarge a room.

"These are best in small bathrooms, powder rooms, and guest baths, or bathrooms going for a vintage style," says Cristina Miguelez, remodeling specialist at Fixr.com.

Cons: Pedestal sinks have a small lip, which limits the room you have for setting out things like soap or toothbrush holders.


Photo by Houzz
.com

Wall-mount sinks

Wall-mount sinks feature a basin that is hung from the wall at a location and height that you choose. The pipes are partially concealed behind the wall.

Cost: Sinks start at around $60 (the model below is $75 from American Standard and available at Home Depot) and can go up to $700 or so.

Pros: These can be very small or fairly large. And they are good from the standpoint of those who want to take into account universal design or to age in place, because a wheelchair can roll under them, says Walsh.

Cons: Wall-mount sinks have a flat horizontal steel hanger bracket that's bolted to the wall with the sink fixture hung on the bracket. Because of this design, a gap can open between the sink and the wall if not installed correctly. "And you won’t have a lot of storage or counter space," says Miguelez.


HomeDepot.com

Countertop sinks

These sinks, also called drop-ins and self-rimming sinks, fit into a variety of countertops. Thanks to their self-rimming nature, they're the simplest type to install. "Countertop sinks are the style most commonly found in high-traffic family bathrooms," says Walsh.

Here are the two types of countertop sinks:

Integral countertop

These sinks combine a countertop and sink together. "The one-piece, seamless design allows for a clean, sleek look," says Walsh. Since there are no crevices, they are also one of the easiest styles to keep clean.

Cost: Starts at $100 and can go up to $1,000.

Pros: These come in a variety of materials from slumped glass to cultured marble. They are also easy to clean and install because it’s all one component.

Cons: If the sink doesn't come with an overflow drain, it will end up requiring a grid drain (one that can't close) in some states.

Drop-in countertop

Cost: A basic drop-in sink starts around $50 to $250, but can be $300 to $1,000 for high-end designer models.

Pros: Drop-in sinks drop into the counter and hang by the rim. They can be decorative in style and are usually used in a remodel because they are budget-friendly.

Cons: The area where the sink meets the counter can be difficult to clean.

Vessel sinks

"Versatile above-counter sinks rise above the countertop, console, or cabinet to create a dramatic focal point," says Walsh. Vessel sinks are typically available in three different types of materials: glass, metal, ceramic, or even petrified wood ($530 at Home Depot). They are best suited for master baths and powder rooms, especially in contemporary, cosmopolitan homes.

Cost: Ceramic sinks go for $80 to $120, while glass sinks cost $150 to $300.

Pros: These sinks tend to come in more materials and wilder designs than other sinks. "These sinks are all about style," says Miguelez.

Cons: "Depending on where you live, there could be a drawback with the drain; some states have plumbing codes that restrict the use of vessel sinks without overflow valves," says Miguelez. In this case, you must install a grid drain. Other observers feel that vessel sinks are just a bathroom fad that is likely to look dated within a few years.


HomeDepot.com

Undercounter sinks

Cost: Around $50 up to $800. (The sink below costs $84 at Home Depot.)

Pros: These sinks are clean and modern. "Plus, they free up usable counter space, and since there is no rim to catch debris, they're also the easiest type of sink to keep clean," says Walsh.

Cons: "They don’t come in a lot of colors or styles, and tend to be pretty plain and utilitarian," says Miguelez.


HomeDepot.com

Jack and Jill sinks

Many homeowners, especially couples, want their routine to be as practical as possible. That's why double sinks have become so popular.

Cost: Double the sink, double the cost. These sinks start at about $300 and can go up to $2,000.

Pros: Having two sinks allows couples to optimize their bathroom use. While one person brushes their teeth, the other can wash their face. A double sink is also a good utilization of space in a large bathroom and offers more counter space for accessories.

Cons: Drawbacks include the reduction of the total usable space in the bathroom. And, of course, installing a double sink entails added expense and additional plumbing. One other consideration: How much do you value your bathroom privacy?


Photo by 2id Interiors

Contact The McLeod Group Network for all your real estate needs! 971.208.5093 or [email protected].

By: Realtor.com, Margaret Heidenry

Exploring Salem Oregon: Marion County Fair

by Amy McLeod Group


July 14 – 19 at the Oregon State Fairgrounds

Have some fun at the best little fair around! Live music Friday with Restless Heart.  Don’t miss Jerrod Niemann on Saturday!  There will be a rodeo, music, food, arts, and a fabulous carnival!  Admission - $5 to $9

Oregon State Fairgrounds
2330 17th St. NE
Salem, OR 97301

503-585-9998

Event Website

Courtesy of Amy McLeod, The McLeod Group Network

Photo Credit: travelsalem.com

Foyer Faux Pas: The Do's—and Don'ts—of Decorating an Entryway

by Amy McLeod Group


First impressions matter, especially when it comes to your home. And the best way to make a good impression on all who enter your abode is to have a sharply decorated entryway.

"Entryways and foyers have really become an important part of the house because it's a view into the lives of the folks who live there," says Dee Frazier, owner and lead organizer of Dee Frazier Interiors.

The entryway is your chance to showcase your personality. Plus, if you're selling anytime soon, this is a potential buyer's first look at your house.

But effectively curating an entryway is something of an art form. And not paying attention to the following principles could be the difference between a foyer that's cluttered instead of one that's chic.

To help you make this hot spot a memorable space in your home, we've polled the pros for their tips and advice—and their warnings of what to avoid.

Do: Add a place to sit

Photo by Dalliance Design LLC 

Whether you use a bench or an extra chair from the kitchen, a place to perch is critical. Where are you going to sit to lace up your sneakers or tug off your boots?

"Make it [do] double duty by opting for a bench or ottoman that offers interior storage," says Jamie Novak, an organizing pro and author of "Keep This Toss That."

Don't: Let clutter creep in

Photo by WO Designs 

Newspaper stacks and piles of shoes are your entryway's worst enemy. They look sloppy and could be a tripping hazard.

Drew Henry of Design Dudes suggests keeping your entryway as open as possible by using light, streamlined furniture like a sleek console table or a mirror.

It's also smart to place a wicker basket near the door as a catch-all for shoes and other items that you're likely to set down upon entering your home.

Do: Consider your entryway's size

Photo by Sigmar 

You may love that vintage coat stand that you snagged from a flea market, but if it takes over your entire entryway, you're just going to bump into it every time you take off your rain slicker. Instead, use your limited floor space for another more useful piece like a bench and mount a small set of hooks or a simple Shaker peg rail for jackets and scarves.

Don't: Waste vertical space

Photo by Sims Hilditch 

Entryways tend to be narrow, so it's best to take advantage of vertical space. Novak suggests adding wall storage like a hanging mail caddy or a small shelf to hold your keys. Label the cubbies for each family member, and you'll never lose a utility bill again.

Do: Consider covering the walls

Photo by elisabethphotography.com 

Give your entryway walls a critical eye and decide whether wallpaper or a wall treatment like stone, wood planks, or tile might add some oomph to your decor, says Frazier.

"Any of these options would make an impact, but if you don't want to cover the entire foyer with wallpaper, you could place it on the wall going up a staircase or in alcoves around the room," she says.

Feeling extra bold? Take it one step further and apply wallpaper on the ceiling.

Don't: Hesitate to add color

Photo by RICCO STYLE Interior Design 

Does the color palette in your home skew neutral? The entryway is an ideal spot to take a risk with color, says Frazier.

Ideas to try: bold artwork on a wall, a brightly patterned throw pillow on the bench, or a vase of colorful flowers.

Do: Think about lighting

Photo by Cottage Home Company 

Your entryway should also feature some light fixtures to illuminate the front part of your house and make it look welcoming to all who stop by. Our experts recommend installing both ambient lighting (e.g., a chandelier) and task lighting (e.g., a floor lamp).

A chandelier offers both light and a dramatic statement upon entry, and a floor lamp can light your way when you enter the front door and then switched off in the evening when everyone goes to bed.

Contact The McLeod Group Network for all your real estate needs! 971.208.5093 or [email protected].

By: Realtor.com, Jennifer Kelly Geddes 

6 Ways to Banish Mildew Smells in the Bathroom

by Amy McLeod Group


Have you ever walked into your bathroom and thought: My God! What is that smell?  Mildew could be to blame for transforming your special oasis into stink central. Don't panic, we're here to help.

Mildew, or mold in its early stage, tends to be found in wet, moisture-prone areas. It looks grayish-white but can turn brown over time. According to the Federal Emergency Management Agency, mildew can grow on wood products, ceiling tiles, insulation, wallpaper, carpet, drywall, fabric, plants, and other organic materials that are commonly found in bathrooms. And once the fungus makes its way onto your precious towels and tiles, you need to get serious about eradicating it.

–– ADVERTISEMENT ––
 

You can get rid of that mildew misery and restore your bathroom to its former lavender-scented glory in no time.

“Minor mold issues can usually be addressed by most homeowners with a little cleanup,” says Gregory Frazier, with Art Plumbing, AC & Electric, in Coral Springs, FL.

Ready to scrub away that stale stink? Here's how.

1. Wash it

The first step to battling the mildew stench is to wash everything. This means washing those hand-towels that have been hanging in the bathroom forever, the musty bathroom rugs, and the stale window curtains. When laundering, experts suggest adding one cup of white vinegar to wash the load. Frequently wash your nonslip mats, too. And, toss that vinyl shower curtain and replace it with a washable cotton, hemp, or nylon shower curtain.

“Bleach can be used to clean the mildew source and stop it from growing," says Gina Perry, senior merchant of cleaning at The Home Depot in Atlanta.

For items that can withstand bleach, FEMA recommends using a 10% solution or 1.25 to 1.5 cup of bleach to a gallon of water. The bleach/water solution can also be used to wipe down shower doors, cabinets, and walls, and to mop hard floors around bathtubs and toilets.

2. Address any water issues

Water can be the big culprit behind that nasty smell. “You can get a mildew smell if you have a slow drain leak under a sink or around a drain,” says Frazier. He says the same thing can happen with toilets if a wax ring seal, which seals the toilet to the flange, has a slight leak that is allowing small amounts of water to seep out under the toilet.

“The fix is to repair the leak promptly and wipe the area that got wet down with a strong, bleach-based cleaner,” Frazier says.

Bathtubs can also occasionally get a mildew smell if they're not properly sealed and if small amounts of water get between the wall and the tub. A bleaching solution can scrub away mildew on top of caulk, but if it’s underneath, it will need to be completely removed and properly recaulked.

3. Let the bathroom breathe

Dark, damp, warm rooms make for a happy home for mildew to thrive. To remedy this, open the windows and let fresh air in. If you don't have a window in the bathroom, keep the bathroom door cracked open when showering. If you need more privacy and prefer to shower with the door closed (no judgment!), install a ceiling fan or consider running an electric fan to keep air moving. Open your cabinets so they can get fresh air, too.

“I find one of the biggest things homeowners can do to combat mildew smells in bathrooms is to ensure they have a properly functioning, properly sized exhaust fan,” says Frazier.

4. Use an air purifier

Mildew reeks, but it can also make people with allergies or asthma sick or irritate their eyes, nose, throat, and lungs.

Sara Alsén, chief purpose officer for Sweden-based Blueair, a leader in air-cleaning solutions, says placing a high-performing air purifier in the bathroom will have a twofold effect: It will remove the unhealthy mold and bacteria in the air and make the smell disappear.

“An air purifier with a high airflow will also increase the air circulation in the bathroom and as such, help fight the mold growth,” she says.

5. Apply a fresh coat of paint

There’s nothing a new paint job can’t cure, right? Try using mold- and mildew-resistant paint.

Rick Watson, director of product information at Sherwin-Williams, says paints with odor-eliminating technology can help inhibit the growth of mold and mildew and reduce common indoor odors, so rooms stay fresher longer.

But make sure to treat the mildew before painting. Bathrooms are splash-prone areas, so lower parts of the walls and corners and edges near the ceiling are typical breeding areas for mildew.

After cleaning, brush a coat of mildew-resistant primer on ceiling and walls to prevent peeling in high-moisture areas. Let the coat of primer dry, then apply the first coat of mildew-resistant paint and say goodbye to that mildew smell.

6. Try an odor eliminator

Odor-absorbing items can help. Charcoal briquettes, an open box of baking soda, or a small pouch of kitty litter can make the bathroom smell fresher by absorbing the odor and the moisture in the air. However, make sure to replace them every month or so. Natural air fresheners, like essential oils or citrus peels, can also cut the stench.

Contact The McLeod Group Network for all your real estate needs! 971.208.5093 or [email protected].

By: Realtor.com, Anayat Durrani 

Exploring Salem Oregon: CSI Salem

by Amy McLeod Group


Repeats Monday through Saturday until August 31, 2019

As the capital city, Salem has long been at the epicenter of crime fighting activity in the state.  Explore how methods for solving crimes have changed over time. $8.

Willamette Heritage Center
1313 Mill Street SE Suite 200
Salem, OR 97301

503-585-7012

Event Website

Courtesy of Amy McLeod, The McLeod Group Network

Photo Credit: travelsalem.com

Happy 4th of July!

by Amy McLeod Group

1206 Lottie Lane: Exciting Opportunity at this Spacious Salem Home!

by Amy McLeod Group

Salem-Keizer OR Real Estate For Sale
1206 Lottie Lane NW, Salem, OR  97304

 


Opportunity is knocking at this spacious home in lovely Salem OR! Priced for as-is condition, this 3 bedroom, 3 full bath, one-level home that is possible for dual living or income property will not last long. Please look past our furnishings to the effortlessly flowing floor plan outfitted with low maintenance flooring, high ceilings, a stylish kitchen, neutral paint colors, recessed lighting, French doors, plus an attached 2 car garage! The lovely eat in kitchen features glistening granite counters with an eating bar and an abundance of cabinetry for plenty of storage. The dining area is bright and open and should fit your whole group. Vaulted ceilings create an alluring atmosphere in the living room, while a cozy fireplace in the family room sets the scene for a relaxing evening. These two large rooms make everyday living a breeze. The master suite provides plush carpeting, double closets and a private bathroom – a soothing retreat at days end. Looking for an extra income opportunity? This property provides a studio apartment with kitchenette and bath! The fenced backyard and patio needs some clean up but with your imagination and hard work, this space will provide endless outdoor enjoyment. Due to medical condition, please excuse our mess!

The McLeod Group Network has distinguished themselves as a leader in the Salem Oregon real estate market. As a full service, real estate team - focused on working with our Seller and Buyer clients to help achieve their real estate goals!

We bring a keen eye for the details of buying or selling a Salem Oregon home and seemingly boundless determination and energy, which is why our clients benefit from our unique brand of real estate service. Rooted in Tradition, focused on the Future –The McLeod Group Network will help make the most of your Salem Oregon real estate experience. With over 40 years of combined experience, you can rest assured that your real estate transaction will be handled and cared for with the utmost respect and attention to detail. Give us a call today 503-798-4001 and discover the difference we can make during your family's move.


When you decide to sell a house that desperately needs updating, you basically have two choices: Sell it as is—in its current condition without improvements—or make upgrades in the hope of reaping bigger bucks down the line.

While renovating your property will inevitably sell your home faster and for more money, listing your property as is has its perks, too—including not having to fork over lots of cash for major improvements you won't get to enjoy, and not dealing with the headaches of those improvements.

Deciding what to do can be overwhelming, but we're here to break it down for you. If want to unload your property pronto and for maximum cash, here are some things to keep in mind.

Out of house often means out of mind

If you've already purchased another home and have one foot dangling out the door, things can get challenging. Between work and family obligations—plus dreaming about decorating your soon-to-be new home—chances are you won’t have the time or energy to reimagine your old one.

If you're set on upgrading your old home to get top dollar, you'll want to find the right professional to guide you through the process, says Eric Stewart, a Realtor® with Eric Stewart Group of Long & Foster Realtors.

“Unless you find a real estate agent whose experience you can trust, someone who has a very good track record preparing homes and understands how to do the work, you’re often better off to sell the property as is, so that you don't get involved in chasing the market,” Stewart says.

Assess the potential workload, time, and money it'll take to upgrade

Get an expert opinion—or better yet, several opinions—regarding how much updating and repair work would be required to boost the home’s bottom line: Does the place just need a good scrub, or an entirely new kitchen and three new bathrooms? And more importantly, do you have the cash, the time, and the patience to see the project through?

“It’s all about whether people want to deal with renovations or not,” says Paul Morse, a licensed contractor and owner of Paul’s Carpentry Workshop in Stoneham, MA.

Morse, who's worked for several clients who wanted to spruce up a neglected home prior to listing it, suggests that sellers should identify three projects that need doing, and then consult their agent to crunch the numbers.

“Sellers should ask what their return would be if they fixed the bathroom and kitchen, for example, versus what the investment would be," he says. "Then, get three prices from three qualified local contractors.”

And don't forget to factor in the cost of owning the home during major renovations. Depending on how extensive your revamp is, you might need to find temporary housing while your property is being gutted, so add that fee to your bottom line.

Take your location—and the market—into account

If your home sits on a great lot in a sought-after loascation, buyers—especially investors—might line up in droves. When the land is more valuable than the structure sitting on it, you might be better off selling the property as is, Stewart says—there’s little point revamping a house that will probably be torn down as soon as the ink on the purchase agreement is dry.

Stewart recalls a recent listing priced at $650,000 in a hot market.

“We sold it as is for $655,000, and the seller was able to leave everything they didn't want in the house, lock the door, and say goodbye, which provided tremendous freedom for them," he says. "The work they would have had to do would never have got them the return they got by doing nothing.”

‘As is’ doesn’t mean ‘falling down’

Of course, doing some inexpensive repairs often helps sell your home faster, notes Lynn Pineda, a Realtor with eXp Realty in Southeast Florida.

“Even when buyers say, ‘I'm going to sell my home as is,’ that doesn't mean you have to present your home in shoddy light to a buyer; you still need to prepare it and make it look good,” she says. “Otherwise, you will sell for less money, or the house will sit on the market and you’ll lose money in the long run.”

If you just want to do the bare minimum and are willing to shell out a few thousand dollars, Morse suggests painting the entire home and resanding hardwood floors, if there are any. These upgrades would take about a month to do, but will make a huge difference in listing photos.

Selling your home as is won’t stop buyers from trying to negotiate

A house that hasn't been updated in years—or even decades—often attracts builders or investors looking to gut or tear everything down and construct a new home. These "fix and flip" buyers always want to maximize their profit, Stewart says, and might try to haggle down the purchase price.

Find a real estate professional who can help you maximize your profits; look for one who's had considerable success selling homes like yours, in your specific area of town. Some good questions to ask include how long comparable properties have stayed on the market before selling, what kinds of houses are selling fast and what condition they’re in, and which neighborhoods are most desirable.

Together, you can weigh what your home's worth—and negotiate a better bottom line.

Looking to sell your home? Contact The McLeod Group Network and get info on your home's value971.208.5093 or [email protected].

By: Realtor.com, Wendy Helfenbaum 

Looking to sell your home? Claim your home and get info on your home's value.

 

Displaying blog entries 1-10 of 426

Share This Page

Contact Information

Photo of The McLeod Group Network Real Estate
The McLeod Group Network
Keller Williams Capital City
1900 Hines St SE #220
Salem OR 97302
971-208-5093
Fax: 971-599-5229

**Disclaimer: Amy McLeod, and her team, do not initiate, process, or service mortgages.  And provide this information only as a service.  You should confirm information here with your Licensed Mortgage Lender.