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The One Thing That Can Make or Break How People Feel About Your House

by Amy McLeod Group


Considering the time and energy homeowners put toward making their house look great (particularly if they're trying to sell), many make the critical mistake of neglecting another one of our senses that can be far more powerful: smell.

Even if you’ve decorated or staged your home perfectly, if potential buyers walk in and detect an unpleasant odor, they could skedaddle fast. Good scents, on the other hand, entice them to linger.

“One of the easiest ways to evoke pleasant feelings about a space is to enhance the way it smells,” says Ben Creamer, a managing broker in Chicago. “It’s often the first thing a person will notice upon entering a space—and it’s one of the things that, when done poorly, can kill a sale, no matter how beautiful the home.”

Before considering what options you have for making your home smell amazing, you want to be sure you’re starting fresh.

“The first step to a good-smelling home is to get rid of any odor,” says Barb Boehler, a real estate agent in Madison, WI. “Make sure to scrub all surfaces, wash all rugs, and have the carpets cleaned. Until this is done, you'll only be masking smells.”

In addition, be mindful in creating a home scent that will be as universally appealing as possible.

“The definition of ‘pleasant’ when it comes to the olfactory senses can vary widely from person to person, so it’s best to keep the scent subtle and clean throughout, with a special emphasis on the kitchen and bath,” says Creamer.

With that in mind, here are 11 tips for making your home smell amazing before guests or home buyers arrive.

Scrub down the bathroom

It goes without saying that scummy showers and grubby toilets are major buyer turnoffs. Use Fabuloso liquid cleaner for bathroom surfaces, including tubs and showers, for a lovely lavender scent, recommends Lisa Jacobs, an organizing professional and founder of Imagine It Done.

Freshen the fridge

Yes, there’s a good chance people will open your refrigerator and take a peek inside. Toss any smelly leftovers or expired condiments, then leave a fresh box of baking soda on a shelf to take care of any lingering odors, says Jacobs.

Take out the trash

Obviously, get rid of any and all garbage before you welcome guests. If your trash cans still carry an odor, sprinkle baking soda in the bottom to absorb it, advises Lisa Molinari, a real estate agent in Morristown, NJ.

Get underfoot

Carpets and rugs can trap a ton of bad smells, especially if you wear shoes in your home or have pets—and warm weather can make them even worse.

An easy fix: Get them shampooed or steam-cleaned regularly, and especially before an open house, says Jennifer Snyder, owner of Neat as a Pin Organizing & Cleaning.

Don an apron

You know all of those hours you’ve spent watching bake-offs on reality TV? Put them to good use by whipping up something sweet that will do double duty making your home smell enticing and providing a snack for potential buyers.

Cedric Stewart, a residential sales consultant in Washington, DC, loves pulling a batch of pumpkin bread or banana bread out of the oven right before the open house begins.

“This provides a great smell, and treats seem to stick in the buyers' mind after they leave,” he says. (It’s also not a bad idea to brew a fresh pot of coffee to go with the baked treat.)

Just add soap

Round up all of those unused bars of fancy soap you’ve been gifted over the years, and place them in a pretty bowl on a bathroom counter. Dove brand soap also works great for this.

“It can fill a room with a remarkably clean, fresh scent for weeks,” says Creamer. “You can even hide a bar or two in a walk-in closet to freshen the space.”

Play with matches

Tried-and-true candles can make a room feel peaceful, as well as fill it with a pleasant scent—provided the scent isn't overpowering.

Jacobs loves Apotheke’s bamboo three-wick candle, while Los Angeles–based real estate agent Melissa Okabe always turns to Diptyque’s baies candle, which smells fresh and fruity.

Light the candle 10 to 15 minutes before the open house begins and, of course, keep it in a well-ventilated area away from anything flammable.

Focus on essentials

Oils, that is. If you’d rather stay away from open flames, you can opt for essential oil diffusers for a similar effect.

Okabe recommends fresh, neutral scents such as lemon or lavender, to add to a high-quality diffuser such as this one from West Elm. (It will be a gadget you use long after you sell your home, too.)

If you don’t want to invest in a diffuser, you can use essential oils in a few other ways.

Tangela Walker-Craft, a home and family blogger, recommends dabbing a drop of oil on cold lightbulbs before turning them on—it’ll give off a subtle fragrance as the bulb warms up. You can also add a few drops to cotton balls and hide them strategically around your home, then simply toss them after the open house concludes.

Raid your laundry room

Face it: Potential buyers are likely going to be peeping through your drawers and cabinets, so you'll need to consider how they smell, as well. An easy way to freshen up confined spaces like these is to add dryer sheets a few days before the open house, says Ben Mizes, a real estate agent in St. Louis.

“These places don’t see a lot of light, so they can have some funky smells—but dryer sheets make them smell like fresh laundry,” he adds.

Simmer down

If you don’t have time to bake, you can create a similarly appealing sweet scent by simmering vanilla extract diluted in water on the stove.

Molinari makes a natural potpourri by adding five cinnamon sticks, 1 teaspoon vanilla, 2 tablespoons cloves, three bay leaves, and an orange rind to a pot of simmering water.

Catch air

High-efficiency particulate air, or HEPA, purifiers can be a little expensive, but they’re extremely effective in removing any lingering strong, strange odors from the air, says Mizes. Combining an air purifier with another method, such as baking cookies, can make a big difference in how your home smells.

At the end of the day, remember to not overdo it. Avoid having multiple scents competing with one another in various rooms.

Instead, “find one neutral, mild scent and let it breathe,” says Molinari. “A scent throughout helps give your home flow and connectivity—so allow it to become the background of the experience.”

 

Contact The McLeod Group Network to find out how much your home is worth in today's market! 971.208.5093 or [email protected].

By: Realtor.com, Kelsey Ogletree 

2615 Front St NE: Spacious 4 Bedroom Salem Home!

by Amy McLeod Group

Salem-Keizer OR Real Estate For Sale
2615 Front St NE, Salem, OR  97301

Meticulously maintained 4 bed, 2 full bath home lets you spread your wings and grow – there is room for everyone inside and out! A spacious living room with toasty wood burning fireplace sets the scene for comfortable everyday living while the elegant formal dining room lets you host the finest dinner parties. A contemporary kitchen featuring updated cabinets, white appliances and tile counters is a delightful space to prepare a meal! There is room for a dining table for your more casual gatherings. Retreat to the main floor master suite and enjoy privacy from the 3 secondary bedrooms on the second floor. All bedrooms are generously sized with abundant closet space and plush carpeting. The 826 sqft in the basement is not included in the total square footage but offers endless possibilities for your growing needs. Grillin’ and chillin’ will be a breeze on the large patio and fenced backyard. Enjoy plenty of room to garden and landscape. The detached 1 car garage helps with all your storage needs. You will appreciate the newer siding, windows and furnace – all you have to do is pack your bags and come on over!

The McLeod Group Network has distinguished themselves as a leader in the Salem Oregon real estate market. As a full service, real estate team - focused on working with our Seller and Buyer clients to help achieve their real estate goals!

We bring a keen eye for the details of buying or selling a Salem Oregon home and seemingly boundless determination and energy, which is why our clients benefit from our unique brand of real estate service. Rooted in Tradition, focused on the Future –The McLeod Group Network will help make the most of your Salem Oregon real estate experience. With over 40 years of combined experience, you can rest assured that your real estate transaction will be handled and cared for with the utmost respect and attention to detail. Give us a call today 503-798-4001 and discover the difference we can make during your family's move.


Buying a foreclosure home, also known as a distressed property, might seem like a less expensive way to get into your next place. These homes usually sell for about 15% below the home's actual value. But buying a foreclosure property isn’t always what it seems. While it may look like a bargain, it could end up being more expensive (and more trouble) than it’s worth.

“On the surface, foreclosed homes can seem awfully appealing,” says Beatrice de Jong, consumer trends expert at Opendoor. “However, costs can be extremely unpredictable, and underlying damages could make a property undesirable.”

With big risks associated with foreclosures, a buyer could end up with a money pit, rather than an affordable new home. That's why you should always budget for the worst-case scenario.

"It's better to be pleasantly surprised than to not have the funds to solve the problem," says Avery Boyce, a real estate agent with Compass Real Estate in Washington, DC.Gt Pre-ApprovedFina lender who can offer competitive mortgage rates and help you with pre-approval.

Here are some of the hidden costs you need to look out for when considering a foreclosure home.

Home repairs

Foreclosures are likely to need some work—and the list of needed repairs and renovations can be long indeed. The worst part is, you might not even have a ballpark estimate of what repairs are needed until you receive the keys.

“The bank will be limited on the disclosures they can provide regarding the condition of the home and previous repairs done," says de Jong.

In some cases, you can get a home inspection before finalizing the sale, but often, a foreclosed house is sold as is.

“Keep in mind that if the previous owners couldn’t make their mortgage payments, they likely also fell behind on regular maintenance," de Jong says. "The home may have foundation problems, need a roof replacement, and require a heavy workload to bring the home up to code."

The property could have also been sitting there, uncared for, for a while. You might have to factor in the additional costs from overgrown lawns, graffiti, weather damage, and more.

Paying too much in a bidding war

Buyers—especially those purchasing a home for the first time—should be careful to not get stuck in an expensive bidding war. Why? They could end up paying too much for a house that they can't afford to fix.

There can be a lot of competition from other eager buyers, real estate developers, and flippers.

“For damaged homes that are priced well below market value, you will probably be competing with developers who plan to rip out everything anyway, and can afford to solve big unknown problems,” Boyce says.

Steer clear of a bidding war and avoid busting your budget on a home that needs more work than you can afford. Before making an offer, set your upper limit, and stick to that number. There will be other houses later on, and it's often better to play it safe when it comes to foreclosures.

Challenges in getting funding

Even if you can get a great price on a foreclosure property, many buyers will still need a loan to help them purchase it. Before you make an offer on a foreclosure, don't bank on being able to get a mortgage.

Some lenders simply won’t offer funding for foreclosure properties. The most common reason: The house is in such bad condition, it can't pass an inspection.

“To get traditional financing, the home needs to be in really good shape,” Boyce explains. “All the utilities need to be on and testable, there can't be holes in the drywall or floors, and there can't be water inside the home.”

Plus, most banks favor all-cash offers on foreclosures because they have already lost money on the property and they don't want to end up in the same situation again.

If you can’t do all cash upfront, it is likely to help to get pre-approved, and it also helps to be willing to put down 20% or more. This way, at least the bank knows you’re serious about buying the house and paying the mortgage.

No room for negotiation

When buying a home the traditional way, the seller may be willing to negotiate on the price. You submit an offer, the seller might counter, and in the end, you could end up paying less than the asking price.

“Dealing with the bank is a more formal and corporate process than dealing with a seller, so expect limited flexibility, if any, when negotiating on the offer price,” de Jong says. “Banks are not likely to budge on the price, since they are mostly concerned with recouping the costs from their investment.”

However, if you'd like to test the waters, Boyce suggests you ask your agent to search for past sales by the bank to see whether the sale price is lower than the list price.

"That will give you some insight into whether it's worth submitting a lower offer,” she says.

Property tax increases

If, after learning about all these hidden fees, you’re still seriously considering a foreclosure, you'll be aware that some properties will need to be overhauled. And while you might be ready to put some serious cash into the project, know that there’s an extra fee associated with a major home makeover: increased property tax. Fixing the house up will increase its value, and in most places, that means your property tax bill will go up.

This may seem like a no-brainer to some seasoned homeowners, but it’s important to remember this tax increase when budgeting for repairs. Don’t get stuck going all in on a home and finding yourself strapped for cash when it’s time to pay taxes.

Let The McLeod Group Network help you find your new home !971.208.5093 or [email protected].

By: Realtor.com,  

1097 Northshire Ct NE: Picture Perfect 4 Bedroom Home!

by Amy McLeod Group

Salem-Keizer OR Real Estate For Sale
1097 Northshire Ct NE, Keizer, OR  97303


Come quick - this beautiful 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath home in a great location will not last long! Picture perfect with attractive landscaping and a charming front porch that invites you inside to find an effortlessly flowing floor plan, spacious rooms, updated lighting, fresh paint inside and out, easy care flooring, a gourmet kitchen and so much more! A sun-filled living room offers plenty of space for entertaining and everyday living. Toast your toes by the cozy fireplace for a relaxing evening. Formal entertaining will be a delight under the light on the dazzling chandelier in the dining room. Stainless steel appliances, custom white cabinets and sparkling quartz counters make this kitchen stylish and functional. A large center island opens into the family room with a corner wood stove and lovely bay window. Relax in the soothing master suite with a private ensuite. The generously sized secondary bedrooms provide plush carpeting and ample closet space. The backyard oasis is a peaceful retreat with a covered patio, raised garden beds and lots of grassy area to run and play! There is an attached 2 car garage and detached shed for all your storage needs. There is so much to offer in quality and location, so pack your bags and come on over!

The McLeod Group Network has distinguished themselves as a leader in the Salem Oregon real estate market. As a full service, real estate team - focused on working with our Seller and Buyer clients to help achieve their real estate goals!

We bring a keen eye for the details of buying or selling a Salem Oregon home and seemingly boundless determination and energy, which is why our clients benefit from our unique brand of real estate service. Rooted in Tradition, focused on the Future –The McLeod Group Network will help make the most of your Salem Oregon real estate experience. With over 40 years of combined experience, you can rest assured that your real estate transaction will be handled and cared for with the utmost respect and attention to detail. Give us a call today 503-798-4001 and discover the difference we can make during your family's move.

Exploring Salem Oregon: Water Lantern Festival

by Amy McLeod Group


Saturday July 27, 2019 – 6:00 PM to 10:00 PM

Cascades Gateway City Park
2100 Turner Road SE
Salem, Oregon

Water Lantern Festival is a floating lantern event that is all about connections. Magical nights in cities across the U.S. include food, games, activities, vendors, music and the beauty of thousands of lanterns adorned with letters of love, hope and dreams reflected upon the water.

As the sun begins to set on the evening sky, Water Lantern Festival begins to shine with the launch of the lanterns onto the water as we Light The Water together. Watch your unique lantern drift out into the water as it joins other lanterns carrying hope, love, happiness, healing, peace, and connection. It's a night that you'll never forget.

Event Website

Courtesy of Amy McLeod, The McLeod Group Network

Photo Credit: waterlanternfestival.com


Owning your home feels great—that is, until the roof leaks. Or a pipe breaks. Or the HVAC just dies—in the middle of a summer heat wave, no less. Which begs the question: How much should homeowners set aside to take care of regular home maintenance and repairs?

If this question catches you off guard, don't feel bad—you have plenty of company.

Xavier Epps, finance expert and CEO of XNE Financial Advising, in Washington, DC, has prepared hundreds of financial plans for new and current homeowners.

"You'd be surprised at the number of clients I've prepared financial plans for that didn't want to consider budgeting for the repairs and maintenance of any sort," he says.

Epps finds that almost 70% of the time, clients actually reject the idea of adding such a line item in their budget. But here's why you should—and how much you should allot to this important fund.

Emergency fund vs. home maintenance fund: What's the difference?

First things first: Budgeting for predictable maintenance and repairs is not the same as saving up for the emergency fund every household should have. An emergency fund, equal to living expenses for a minimum of one to three months, is often recommended as a buffer for unexpected expenses and loss of income.

For example, if you get sick and can't work for two months, your car breaks down (beyond normal maintenance), or you have to travel on short notice to a funeral—those are all emergencies.

If you've already used your emergency fund to perform routine home maintenance and repairs, you won't have any cash reserves left when a true emergency strikes. You should have an amount in your monthly budget allocated specifically for home maintenance and repairs, both planned and unforeseen, so you can afford to keep your house in tiptop shape without jeopardizing your important emergency fund or going into debt.

How much should I budget for home maintenance and repairs?

"Budget between 1% and 4% of the purchase price of your home for annual preventative maintenance and repair costs," says John Bodrozic of Sacramento, CA, who's co-founder of HomeZada, a digital home management platform.

Where your actual costs fall in that range depends largely on the age and condition of your home.

If your home is newer, or if it has been recently and thoroughly renovated, you might be able to budget less for maintenance and repairs, at least for the first few years.

"If your home is less than 5 years old, then use the lower percentage of 1%, as most of your home's equipment, appliances, building materials, fixtures, finishes, etc. are still relatively new, thus probably in good working condition," says Bodrozic.

If you bought your place new from a builder, you may even have warranties on individual items in your home, or an overall warranty. That could substantially reduce the amount you have to spend on repairs while the warranties are in effect.

Don't assume that living in a new home is maintenance-free, however, or that you won't need to make changes and improvements to it. A home that hasn't been lived in before may not have all of the features you need. And homebuilders often do a cursory job of landscaping. When you discover how little topsoil they used in your yard, you may need to budget for outside improvements, too.

If your home is more than 25 years old, on the other hand, plan on budgeting closer to 4%.

"Nothing lasts forever. The natural life span of the collection of materials your home is made of is getting older, therefore you will have more fix-it and repair costs," Bodrozic says.

Another way to predict expenses for home upkeep is to look at how many square feet you have, both in the house and outside. Home prices vary widely throughout the country, but as a general rule, the bigger the house and lot, the higher your maintenance costs. A home on significant acreage generally requires more maintenance than a tract house on a postage stamp–size lot, regardless of how much the house is worth. Or when you need a new roof, you'll pay a lot more on a larger house.

Reasons to keep track of past home maintenance expenses

If you've lived in your home for a number of years and you've kept the place up, one way to budget for maintenance and repairs is to look at what you spent last year. Repairs and replacements, especially, can seem like one-time expenditures. However, over time they tend to average out. The refrigerator may have been replaced last year, but in a 20-year-old house, that's not the only thing that's wearing out. This year, it may be the dishwasher or water heater. Get ready for it.

If you haven't lived in your house for long or if you don't have records of how much you spent last year, consider tracking your home maintenance and repair costs. At least mark them on your credit card bills, or keep the receipts in a marked file.

How can I save money on home maintenance?

Follow these tips to keep your annual home maintenance and repair expenses as low as possible, and still keep your house in tiptop shape:

  • Know your home. If you're about to buy a home, be sure to have it inspected, and try to determine how old each appliance and major home component is. "Remember, every piece of the home has a useful life attached to it, so it's best to get a feel for how old the items are as soon as you can," says Epps. "If you buy a home with 10-year-old hardwood floors, there's a great chance you'll need to budget for replacement or refinishing." Likewise, wall paint usually needs to be redone in five to 10 years, and an HVAC system may last 10 to 15 years, according to Epps. Consider creating a schedule of when you may need to replace major items.
  • Be proactive in your home maintenance. You'll save money in the long run by proactively maintaining your home, rather than waiting for something to quit working. This includes obvious upkeep such as mowing and pruning your yard, plus the jobs that are more easily forgotten—like changing the air filters, cleaning your dryer ducts, and checking your fire extinguishers, according to Bodrozic. "It's important to keep a recurring schedule of these tasks, because if you don't do them, you are more likely to have larger, more expensive repair costs when things break," he explains. You might even want to use an organization app such as HomeZada to create a recurring list of maintenance tasks for you.
  • Don't delay when you discover signs of trouble. If the dryer isn't getting the clothes dry, clean out the vents now. Don't wait until it is impossibly clogged or starts a fire. Any dripping sounds or signs of water intrusion? Fix it or call for professional help, before structural damage and mold occur. Pests and wildlife intruders also need to be dealt with promptly—termites cause over $5 billion in property damage every year, which is rarely covered by homeowners insurance, according to Tommy Giardino, senior vice president of operations at Arrow Exterminators in Atlanta. If you hear noises from rodents and squirrels, take action immediately. "Rodents and squirrels are known for using insulation for building nests and gnawing on wires, which can lead to electrical fires," he says.
  • Learn the basics of home maintenance. You can save a lot of money by learning home maintenance basics. Know your limits, however. It's more cost-effective to hire a pro than it is to take on more than you can handle, or worse yet, to get hurt trying.

Dreaming of homeownership? Let The McLeod Group Network find your find your new home !971.208.5093 or [email protected].

By: Realtor.com, Sally Herigstad

Is Renting Right for Me?

by Amy McLeod Group


If you’re currently renting and have dreams of owning your own home, it may be a good time to think about your next move. With rent costs rising annually and many helpful down payment assistance programs available, homeownership may be closer than you realize.

According to the 2018 Bank of America Homebuyer Insights Report, 74% of renters plan on buying within the next 5 years, and 38% are planning to buy within the next 2 years.

When those same renters were asked why they disliked renting, 52% said rising rental costs were their top reason, and 42% of renters believe their rent will rise every year. The full results of the survey can be seen below:

It’s no wonder rising rental costs came in as the top answer. The median asking rent price has risen steadily over the last 30 years, as you can see below.

There is a long-standing rule that a household should not spend more than 28% of its income on housing expenses. With nearly half of renters (48%) surveyed already spending more than that, and with their rents likely to rise again, it’s never a bad idea to reconsider your family’s plan and ask yourself if renting is your best angle going forward. When asked why they haven’t purchased a home yet, not having enough saved for a down payment (44%) came in as the top response. The report went on to reveal that nearly half of all respondents believe that “a 20% down payment is required to buy a home.”

The reality is, the need to produce a 20% down payment is one of the biggest misconceptions of homeownership, especially for first-time buyers. That means a large number of renters may be able to buy now, and they don’t even know it.

Bottom Line

If you’re one of the many renters who are tired of rising rents but may be confused about what is required to buy in today’s market, let The McLeod Group Network help to determine your path to homeownership. 971.208.5093 or [email protected].

By: KCM Crew

Exploring Salem Oregon: Gardening Class at Brooks Winery

by Amy McLeod Group


Join us for a day in the garden with our Master Gardener. Learn the principles of biodynamics. Barbara will also teach on integrative planting for soil development, water conservation and pest reduction. She will also discuss garden designs that reserve space for deer and other wildlife, while also protecting kitchen crops. At the conclusion of the class you'll be able to select produce to go and enjoy lunch and a glass of wine on our lower patio. $50.

Brooks Winery
21101 SE Cherry Blossom Lane
Amity, OR 97101

5034351278

Event Website

Courtesy of Amy McLeod, The McLeod Group Network

Photo Credit: travelsalem.com


You’ve lived in your home for years and haven't exactly been on top of regular maintenance tasks. Now, your windows are covered in plastic wrap to cut down on the cold drafts, your ceiling seems to be leaking, and those shrubs you planted to conceal a few small cracks in the foundation just aren’t cutting it anymore.

Hey, we’re not judging! But if you’re ready to put your home up for sale, know this: Buyers and their agents are going to zero in on all those things that need doing—as well as some things you hadn't even noticed yourself.

So why not get ahead of the curve by hiring a licensed home inspector who can pinpoint what needs fixing?

Of course, most sellers don’t get their homes inspected before listing them, because the buyer usually orders an inspection during escrow, says Marc Lyman, a Realtor® with Pacific Sotheby's International Realty in San Diego, CA. And who wants to pay for something twice?

But if you're willing to invest the time and money, a thorough inspection before listing your property can make it easier to price your home, manage repairs, and even help sell it faster—and for more money.

So what are the some of the reasons why a pre-listing inspection makes sense? Let's take a look.

It can save you if you've neglected home maintenance

If you have a busy life—or maybe even if you don't—chances are that obsessing over regular home maintenance might not be your No. 1 priority during downtime. Trouble is, letting painting, roof repairs, and other routine chores slide can lead to bigger issues down the road, says Chicago-based Frank Lesh, ambassador for the American Society of Home Inspectors.

“In a lot of cases, people think, ‘I've been here for 30 years; the house is fine. There's nothing wrong with it,’" he says. "But they’re looking at it with rose-colored glasses.”

Instead of worrying what a buyer’s inspector will uncover—and which could potentially kill the sale—be proactive with a pre-listing inspection, Lesh says. This way, rather than being blindsided, you can then decide whether to make the necessary repairs or to account for that deferred maintenance by reducing the list price. Which leads us to…

You can make more a bigger profit on your sale

Sure, a home inspection that you don't have to do is going to cost money. (An inspection for a 1,200- to 1,500-square-foot house in an average market, for instance, will cost between $350 and $600, Lesh says.) But as the saying goes: Sometimes you have to spend money to make money.

After all, if you invest a little more to repair and spruce up anything the pre-inspection reveals, you can justify listing your home at a higher price, Lyman says. Plus, he adds, in most states, home improvement repairs you carry out before selling your house are deductible from the profit you make from the sale.

Sometimes, just knowing that a pro has given the house a proper once-over can persuade a buyer to make a bid (assuming that you actually follow the inspector’s recommendations).

“It minimizes surprises for a buyer, and can give a buyer more confidence in the property," Lyman says.

You won't have to scramble to fix things at the last minute

Once a buyer’s inspector submits a report, sellers are usually faced with two choices: If problems are found with the house, they can then either slash money from the sale price, or opt to carry out repairs before the closing date. That often leaves sellers in the lurch, having to get work done pronto—and sometimes paying a premium for the rush work.

After a pre-listing inspection, sellers can research contractors and make the necessary repairs within a time frame of their choosing, so that everything is ready before potential buyers even visit the property.

It'll minimize back-and-forth negotiation

Buyers often use their home inspection as leverage, asking the seller (that's you!) for steep discounts based on what their inspector’s report reveals. Not surprisingly, the buyer’s inspection is often where the deal falls apart.

If you’ve already uncovered the issues and addressed them, you can raise the price of your home accordingly, Lyman says. “That gives the buyer less leverage in the request for repair process,” he explains.

Also, in red-hot markets where multiple bids come fast and furious, there's always a chance that buyers might accept your pre-listing inspection without insisting on doing their own. This can make for a quicker sale, Lesh says.

But make sure a pre-inspection doesn’t work against you

As advantageous as a pre-inspection can be, don’t forget that the inspector’s report could be a double-edged sword: Once you know about a problem, you can’t ignore it, Lyman says.

Sellers are legally obligated to disclose any problems that a home inspection unearths.

“For sellers unwilling to do repairs, their own inspection could be used as leverage to negotiate on price and in the request-for-repair process,” he says.

Before committing to a pre-inspection, find out what other sellers in your area are doing. Your agent can help guide you on whether it's necessary to sell for more, or if there's a better—and more affordable—strategy for getting your home sold.

Looking to sell your home? Contact The McLeod Group Network to learn how much your home is worth in today's market!  971.208.5093 or [email protected].

By: Realtor.com, Wendy Helfenbaum

The Ultimate Guide to Bathroom Sinks: Which Type Is Right for You?

by Amy McLeod Group


There are many styles of bathroom sinks, and each has its particular pros and cons—including its price. Since this seemingly simple fixture can have such a big impact on how a bathroom functions and looks, you may be wondering: What's the best basin for our home?

That depends, of course, on your sense of style, budget, how many toiletries you like to stash on your counter, and plenty of other factors. "There are a large number of sinks that can be used in the bathroom, and in many cases, it’s just a question of style and preference," says Sarah Fishburne, director of trend and design at Home Depot. "But in a few cases, you may definitely benefit from one style over another. For instance, a square sink tends to look more updated and offer a larger wash area that some might want. But others will want to have as much counter space as possible, making round and oval sinks a better choice."

–– ADVERTISEMENT ––
 

So, in our latest edition of the Dream Bathroom Remodeling Guide, we delve into the various types of bathroom sinks and how to figure out which one's right for you.

Pedestal sinks

A pedestal sink consists of a wall-hung basin with a pedestal that covers the plumbing.

Cost: $50 to $600

Pros: This is the most common type of bathroom sink, which means that they are easy to find, says James Walsh, vice president of American Standard china ware and bathing. Their sleek, sophisticated lines can also appear to enlarge a room.

"These are best in small bathrooms, powder rooms, and guest baths, or bathrooms going for a vintage style," says Cristina Miguelez, remodeling specialist at Fixr.com.

Cons: Pedestal sinks have a small lip, which limits the room you have for setting out things like soap or toothbrush holders.


Photo by Houzz
.com

Wall-mount sinks

Wall-mount sinks feature a basin that is hung from the wall at a location and height that you choose. The pipes are partially concealed behind the wall.

Cost: Sinks start at around $60 (the model below is $75 from American Standard and available at Home Depot) and can go up to $700 or so.

Pros: These can be very small or fairly large. And they are good from the standpoint of those who want to take into account universal design or to age in place, because a wheelchair can roll under them, says Walsh.

Cons: Wall-mount sinks have a flat horizontal steel hanger bracket that's bolted to the wall with the sink fixture hung on the bracket. Because of this design, a gap can open between the sink and the wall if not installed correctly. "And you won’t have a lot of storage or counter space," says Miguelez.


HomeDepot.com

Countertop sinks

These sinks, also called drop-ins and self-rimming sinks, fit into a variety of countertops. Thanks to their self-rimming nature, they're the simplest type to install. "Countertop sinks are the style most commonly found in high-traffic family bathrooms," says Walsh.

Here are the two types of countertop sinks:

Integral countertop

These sinks combine a countertop and sink together. "The one-piece, seamless design allows for a clean, sleek look," says Walsh. Since there are no crevices, they are also one of the easiest styles to keep clean.

Cost: Starts at $100 and can go up to $1,000.

Pros: These come in a variety of materials from slumped glass to cultured marble. They are also easy to clean and install because it’s all one component.

Cons: If the sink doesn't come with an overflow drain, it will end up requiring a grid drain (one that can't close) in some states.

Drop-in countertop

Cost: A basic drop-in sink starts around $50 to $250, but can be $300 to $1,000 for high-end designer models.

Pros: Drop-in sinks drop into the counter and hang by the rim. They can be decorative in style and are usually used in a remodel because they are budget-friendly.

Cons: The area where the sink meets the counter can be difficult to clean.

Vessel sinks

"Versatile above-counter sinks rise above the countertop, console, or cabinet to create a dramatic focal point," says Walsh. Vessel sinks are typically available in three different types of materials: glass, metal, ceramic, or even petrified wood ($530 at Home Depot). They are best suited for master baths and powder rooms, especially in contemporary, cosmopolitan homes.

Cost: Ceramic sinks go for $80 to $120, while glass sinks cost $150 to $300.

Pros: These sinks tend to come in more materials and wilder designs than other sinks. "These sinks are all about style," says Miguelez.

Cons: "Depending on where you live, there could be a drawback with the drain; some states have plumbing codes that restrict the use of vessel sinks without overflow valves," says Miguelez. In this case, you must install a grid drain. Other observers feel that vessel sinks are just a bathroom fad that is likely to look dated within a few years.


HomeDepot.com

Undercounter sinks

Cost: Around $50 up to $800. (The sink below costs $84 at Home Depot.)

Pros: These sinks are clean and modern. "Plus, they free up usable counter space, and since there is no rim to catch debris, they're also the easiest type of sink to keep clean," says Walsh.

Cons: "They don’t come in a lot of colors or styles, and tend to be pretty plain and utilitarian," says Miguelez.


HomeDepot.com

Jack and Jill sinks

Many homeowners, especially couples, want their routine to be as practical as possible. That's why double sinks have become so popular.

Cost: Double the sink, double the cost. These sinks start at about $300 and can go up to $2,000.

Pros: Having two sinks allows couples to optimize their bathroom use. While one person brushes their teeth, the other can wash their face. A double sink is also a good utilization of space in a large bathroom and offers more counter space for accessories.

Cons: Drawbacks include the reduction of the total usable space in the bathroom. And, of course, installing a double sink entails added expense and additional plumbing. One other consideration: How much do you value your bathroom privacy?


Photo by 2id Interiors

Contact The McLeod Group Network for all your real estate needs! 971.208.5093 or [email protected].

By: Realtor.com, Margaret Heidenry

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