Real Estate Information Archive

Blog

Displaying blog entries 1-7 of 7

Exploring Salem Oregon: Salem Hardy Plant Society Fall Plant Sale

by Amy McLeod Group


September 7, 2019 – 9:00 AM to 3:00 PM

Sebright Gardens
7185 Lakeside Drive NE
Salem, OR 97305

Seventeen local garden nurseries and artists will be in one location to make it easy for you to shop. The nursery owners and artists themselves will be there to answer any questions you might have. There will also be a food truck.

For more information call: 503-463-9615

Event Website

Courtesy of Amy McLeod, The McLeod Group Network

Photo Credit: salemhardyplantsociety.com

6 Green Gardening Rules Every Eco-Friendly Homeowner Should Know

by Amy McLeod Group


You shun plastic straws and carry your own tote bags to the grocery store (well, most of the time). So why not continue the green theme in your garden and plant with the planet in mind?

Low-water, zero-waste, and chemical-free options abound for both flower beds and containers. And by embracing green gardening, you can help improve your yard's soil quality and attract beneficial pollinators. To get started, try some of these green gardening techniques below.

1. Use green containers


Photo by Noelle Johnson Landscape Consulting

Milk jugs, yogurt cups, and egg cartons are all reusable and free for starting seedlings.

"Just make sure you place egg cartons on a cookie sheet or something else that holds water as they're porous," notes landscaping expert Chris Lambton, host of DIY Network's "Yard Crashers" and "Lawn and Order."

He also reuses Solo cups left over from parties (poke holes in the bottom and transplant tomatoes into them as they outgrow egg cartons or other small cups).

Feeling creative? Make your own seed containers from folded newspaper (most publishers use soy ink, which is nontoxic). Newspapers are biodegradable, and the whole thing—paper, dirt, and seeds—can be planted in the ground, explains Susan Brandt, the plant pro at Blooming Secrets, an e-commerce gardening site.

Two other green containers include Mason jars (excellent as succulent planters, says Brandt) and peat pots.

"Peat cups are made from natural fibers and can be planted directly into the garden without causing root shock," reports Chris Cassell, director of sustainability at Lowe's.

2. Add a rain barrel


Photo by Scot Eckley, Inc.

Catch rain in just about any type of container, and then use it to water your garden.

"Plants benefit from rainwater as it's free of the chemicals and minerals found in tap," says Cassell. If you install rain barrels around your downspouts, you'll really save on your water bill, too.

A word of caution: Make sure rain barrels are installed correctly so they don't cause flooding around your house, and elevate them to fit your watering can under the spigot, suggests Lambton.

3. Go chemical-free

Roundup or any pesticide is a no-no in an eco garden. Instead, try neem oil (an organic pesticide extracted from the tropical neem tree) for bugs and liquid seaweed and compost for fertilizer, says Lambton.

"Neem oil has low toxicity and, when mixed with water, it can be used as an insecticide, fungicide, and miticide," says Cassell.

4. Water wisely


Photo by Willard & May

Don't just spray willy-nilly and then walk away. There's a smart (and green) way to hydrate your garden. The pros say to water early in the morning, when there's usually less wind and temperatures are lower. The result? Water is absorbed more effectively and less is evaporated.

If you can, use a drip irrigation system or soaker hoses, which are most effective at watering at soil level, says Brandt.

5. Make some DIY fertilizer


Photo by Smalls Landscaping 

Yes, you can make your own fertilizer. Cassell says to find a hidden corner of your garden where you can layer grass clippings and fallen green leaves with brown materials like dried-up leaves and even coffee grounds. Cut larger pieces into smaller ones, add water to the pile and top with garden soil.

"Turn your mound during the season to expose the ingredients to oxygen and then use it in the spring as fertilizer," he says.

Grass clippings can also be applied as mulch. Pine needles are another green mulch pick as they acidify soil, says Brandt. Try it on azaleas, which are acid-loving.

Or got a compost heap for your kitchen scraps? Compost can also be used as fertilizer—just spread it on your flower and vegetable beds to add nutrients and beneficial microbes to the soil.

So how do you know when your compost is ready?

"Check for a good earthy smell in your compost, and be sure it's dark in color and feels crumbly," notes Cassell. If it's not quite ready, give it more time (ingredients that are still decomposing can attract unwanted pests). Here's more on how to make compost.

6. Attract plant pollinators

Photo by Healy Design Inc.

Nothing is greener than a bunch of butterflies and bees circling your flowers to pollinate the plants. And don't forget hummingbirds, moths, flies, and even some beetles—they all move pollen from flower to flower, says Cassell.

Plants that'll attract these important creatures include catmint, lavender, cosmos, calendula, butterfly flower, sunflowers, sweet alyssum, and lantana.

Contact The McLeod Group Network for all your Real Estate needs! 971.208.5093 or [email protected].

By: Realtor.com, Jennifer Kelly Geddes

Exploring Salem Oregon: Iris Bloom Season Open House

by Amy McLeod Group


During bloom season display garden is open daily. Our 10-acre display garden contains over 500 named iris varieties and countless companion plants. Fresh Iris bouquets available. Enjoy our gift shop and wine tasting. This event is dog friendly on leash. $5 per car. 

Schreiner's Iris Gardens
3625 Quinaby Rd. NE
Salem, OR 97302

503-393-3232 or 800-525-2367

 

Event Website

Courtesy of Amy McLeod, The McLeod Group Network

Photo Credit: travelsalem.com

12 Genius Yard and Garden Maintenance Hacks to Simplify Your Summer

by Amy McLeod Group


Having a lush green yard as a retreat is fantastic. But maintaining a yard? Easier said than mowed. So the question then becomes: How can you enjoy your backyard oasis with the minimum of effort on pruning, weeding, and anxiously hovering over every blade of grass?

Look no further than "Home Hacks," our weekly series on simplifying all aspects of home life. Since yard maintenance may be looming large over you right about now, here are some smart shortcuts to make the coming warm-weather months way easier.

1. Get your garden tools in good shape

After months in cold, damp storage, your gardening tools can likely use a spring cleaning. To shine rusty tools without elbow grease, soak them in white vinegar for 24 hours, then scrub with steel wool. Keep tools from rusting again by storing them in a bucket of builder's sand. (It really works!)

2. Water less for longer

"Instead of frequently watering your grass lightly, water it only two times per week for longer periods of time," says Barbara Roueche, brand manager for lawn-care equipment manufacturer Troy-Bilt.

The reason: Not only will you save water, but this promotes deeper grass-root growth, thus enabling your lawn to better tolerate drought.


Take a cue from a good rainfall to determine how much water your grass needs. About 20 minutes, twice each week, should do the trick.

3. Use old newspaper and never pull weeds again

Weeds in your flowerbeds are a time-stealing eyesore (plus weeds steal moisture from flowers, causing them to wilt). Banish weeds for the entire summer with this simple trick.

"Pull all the weeds from your beds once, and then add a layer of newspaper beneath mulch," says Roueche.

Newspaper will block new weeds from taking root, as well as help retain moisture. It is also nontoxic and will eventually decompose into the soil.

4. Kill weeds with vinegar

You can also brew up an all-natural vinegar mixture to keep weeds away, says Roueche. Not only is this hack environmentally friendly, it's also a safe option for those with pets sniffing around the yard.

Pour 1 gallon of everyday white vinegar into a bucket and add 1 cup of table salt. Stir the solution until the salt dissolves. Add 1 tablespoon of liquid dishwashing soap to help the mixture stick, and you've got a powerful weedkiller. Funnel it into a spray bottle and spray liberally on the weeds on a sunny day. Any weeds hit with this solution will die within several days.

5. Shine outdoor furniture

Clean stains on plastic outdoor furniture by rubbing marks with a dab of white toothpaste. Toothpaste's tiny granules gently clear stains that most other cleaners can't reach.

If you need to revive sun-faded colors on plastic furniture, polish with a small amount of petroleum jelly or mineral oil. Let the jelly or oil sit for an hour, then wipe it off for a refreshed shine.

6. Prevent pests with pantry items

"Instead of using harmful pesticides, repel critters by sprinkling coffee grounds or citrus peels in your garden," says Roueche.

Both are natural repellents for pests, because of their odor and acidity. Bonus: Coffee grounds also serve as a fertilizer and improve a soil's drainage, water retention, and aeration.

7. Protect your garden from animals and pets

Hate how animals (your own, or intruders) tend to munch on your garden's offerings before you can get a taste? Some plastic forks can fix that.

"Stick plastic forks point-side up around delicate plants," says Jennifer Harder, founder and CEO of Jennifer Harder Mortgage Brokers. Most animals will steer clear lest they hurt their delicate feet.

8. Keep your roses healthy with milk

Roses are susceptible to unsightly fungus, in the form of blotches on leaves. The answer is in your fridge. Take half a cup of milk and add it to a cup of water in a spray bottle.

"Then spray the watered-down milk onto your rose leaves to kill spotting fungus," says DIY expert and Liberty Mutual Insurance consultant Chip Wade.

9. Skip watering your plants

Always forgetting to water your plants? A hack using plastic water bottles can save you the trouble. Fill them with water, then use a needle or pin to poke a few holes in the cap. From there, half bury the water bottle upside down in the dirt near the plants you want to water. The holes in the cap allow for a slow trickle to keep plants hydrated for as long as a couple of weeks (depending on the size of your water bottle).

10. Mow easier

While most people mow back and forth across their lawn, turning around once they reach the sides, there is an easier way: Mow in a spiral shape, from the inside out. This reduces the amount of turning, which is tough to wrangle with a push mower and all but impossible with a ride-on mower. Here's more on how to mow a lawn.

11. Don't bother raking up lawn clippings

Hate raking up your lawn clippings? Leave them on your lawn instead. They'll help fertilize your lawn and keep it lush. Your best bet is to keep these clippings short enough that they won't clump on top of your grass, but rather fall to the earth below. A good rule of thumb to make this happen is the one-third rule: Snip just the top third of the blades of grass so they're small enough to fall through.

12. Make your lawnmower nonstick

A great way to keep cut grass from clogging up your lawnmower's cutting blades is to use cooking spray on the blades.

"This saves a lot of time on cleanup and maintenance, by keeping grass from sticking to the blades," says Harder.

Contact The McLeod Group Network for all your Real Estate needs! 971.208.5093 or [email protected]

By: Realtor.com, Margaret Heidenry 
Lisa Kaplan Gordon contributed to this post

Friday, May 18, 2018 - 9:00 AM to 6:00 PM - Repeating every Friday until May 31, 2018

Tour Schreiner's Iris Gardens’ 10-acre display gardens filled with over 500 named Irises. Iris-themed gifts, glassware, handcrafted artwork, gardening tools and accessories. Fresh-cut Irises are available for purchase every day, weather permitting. $5 per car.

Schreiner's Iris Gardens
3625 Quinaby Rd. NE
Salem, OR 97303

503-393-3232 or 800-525-2367

www.schreinersgardens.com

Courtesy of Amy McLeod, The McLeod Group Network

Photo Credit: travelsalem.com

Exploring Salem Oregon: Gardenpalooza 2018

by Amy McLeod Group

Saturday, April 7 - 8:00 AM to 4:00 PM

More than 40 Vendors will attend Gardenpalooza where you can shop at the country store, eat delicious foods and see hundreds of plants and tools on display.

Fir Point Farms
14601 Arndt Rd.
Aurora, OR 97002

503-793-6804

Get Directions Here

Event Website

Courtesy of Amy McLeod, The McLeod Group Network

Photo Credit: gardengalleryironworks.net

Exploring Salem Oregon: Friends of Bush Gardens Plant Sale

by Amy McLeod Group

Friday, April 21, 2017 - 10:00 am to Saturday, April 22, 2017 - 4:00 pm

Healthy plants for all your gardening needs including organic vegetables and herbs, from some of the Mid-Willamette Valley's most dedicated growers. Check the schedule for a new design clinic.

Salem's Riverfront Pavilion and North Meadow
200 Water St. NE
Salem, OR 97301

503-588-2410

Event Website

Courtesy of Amy McLeod, The McLeod Group Network

Displaying blog entries 1-7 of 7

Share This Page

Contact Information

Photo of The McLeod Group Network Real Estate
The McLeod Group Network
Keller Williams Capital City
1900 Hines St SE #220
Salem OR 97302
971-208-5093
Fax: 971-599-5229

**Disclaimer: Amy McLeod, and her team, do not initiate, process, or service mortgages.  And provide this information only as a service.  You should confirm information here with your Licensed Mortgage Lender.