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Looking to make your outdoor area more livable? Consider adding a hardscape feature to complement your plants and flowers. A decked-out backyard can give a big boost to your property's value, and hardscaping can be a central part of this. So what is hardscaping and how much should you budget to make it into a reality for your home? Read on.

What is hardscaping?

Your home’s outdoor spaces consist of hardscapes and softscapes.

“While softscapes are your plants and living elements, hardscaping encompasses the nonliving elements of landscaping—like a paver patio, stone wall, or a gazebo,” says Joe Raboine, director of residential hardscapes at Belgard, which makes residential and commercial products.

Hardscaping can increase the functionality of your outdoor space and can be designed to match your preferred style: traditional, modern, rustic, you name it.

“Using materials such as wood, stone, metal, and concrete, hardscapes can also add physical boundaries and dimension to your yard," says Missy Henriksen, vice president of public affairs for the National Association of Landscape Professionals.

Types of hardscaping

An outdoor kitchen is an increasingly popular type of hardscaping.
Belgard

With a nearly endless list of hardscaping features available, we asked our experts to highlight some of the most popular projects among homeowners.

Many people prefer patios and decks since they can expand a home’s living space, Henriksen says. “Fire features such as fireplaces or fire pits are also among the most common trends in outdoor living as they offer a place to gather and socialize.”

“Garden walls, planting beds, large boulders, stone edging, accent stones, pillars or columns, seat walls, and stepping stones are examples of in-demand features,” says Al Ferrante, owner of Century Building Materials, in Lindenhurst, NY.

In fact, you may even have a hardscape on your property and not even know it! Ferrante says the concrete or stone steps around your doorway could be considered hardscape.

Water hardscape features

Homeowners also like water hardscape features because they offer several advantages.

“In addition to being aesthetically appealing, they are functional for masking traffic noises and for providing additional privacy to your own space,” says Raboine. The sound of running water is also relaxing for most folks.

Some examples of water hardscape features are “waterfalls, fountains, ponds, stream bed,” Ferrante says. These can range from a simple accent to an elaborate focal point.

“The combination of dry and water hardscapes in a yard can improve the livability and beauty, such as adding the classic pairing of a pool and patio,” Henriksen explains.

Hardscaping trends

Photo by Ro | Rockett Design

If you're looking to stay on the cutting edge of design—or are considering selling your home in the near future—consider these hot hardscaping trends.

  • Mix and match: “Mixing materials, textures, and colors in a well-designed space can create eye-popping focal points and designs,” say Raboine. For example, use a different color hardscape for your patio border. This helps define the space.
  • Sleek and modern: Modern, linear designs are increasing in popularity. “Porcelain pavers, for example, are ideal for a contemporary design and are incredibly durable, frost-resistant, skid-resistant, stain-resistant, and easy to clean,” Raboine says.
  • Multipurpose walls: Retaining walls can also be used as benches for seating. Or you can build raised planters or garden beds into the walls to grow herbs and vegetables.

Approximate costs

As with any type of home improvement project, costs vary depending on the size and complexity of the hardscaping, as well as the materials used.

As a general rule, Henricksen says, you can expect to pay $7 to $22 per square foot for hardscaping.

“For example, the installation of a 10-foot flagstone patio with a natural stone gas-burner fire feature will generally cost around $6,000,” she says.

Raboine estimates the following costs for other hardscaping projects:

  • Paving a patio: $900 to $1,000
  • Retaining wall: $3,000 to $8,000
  • Patio/eating area: $1,000 to $2,000
  • Fire pit: $300 to $1,500
  • Pool deck: $3,000 to $12,000
  • Outdoor kitchen: $4,000 to $20,000

Contact The McLeod Group Network for all your real estate needs! 971.208.5093 or [email protected].

By and photo credit: Realtor.com, Terri Williams

5 Hot Hardscaping Trends Homeowners Should Try Right Now

by Amy McLeod Group


Whether you're putting your place on the market or just looking to give your crib some extra curb appeal, your property's exterior design deserves just as much attention as the interior.

But while you might've spent hours contemplating new window shutters, light fixtures, and foliage, there's a good chance one exterior improvement has fallen toward the bottom of your priority list: your hardscaping. After all, how much can you possibly change a pathway or sidewalk?

Well, a lot, apparently.

The truth is, hardscaping is one of the first—if not the first—things to consider when sprucing up your outdoor space. We're talking about the structures or materials that divide sections and provide places to walk and sit.

"Hardscaping should be the first component considered [because] it’s really the structure of the landscaping," explains Frederico Azevedo, founder and CEO of Unlimited Earth Care. "If hardscaping is left as an afterthought to the overall design, it will disrupt the flow of any property."

And, just like the plants you choose to grow in your backyard or the color you use to paint your front door, there are plenty of hardscaping trends that will help your property shine. Below are five expert-approved ways to improve your property’s walkways, sidewalks, and pathways.

1. Grass
Photo by Westover Landscape Design
 

Once upon a time, having grass sprout between your slabs of stone was considered sloppy and distasteful. Today, however, it's actually encouraged to integrate greenery into your hardscaping.

"Grass-jointed paving paths combine structured geometry, lush natural textures, and vibrant color," says landscape architect Janice Parker. "They provide an overlapping of formal and informal elements. Thoughtful stone selection, based on the architectural aesthetic of the home, ensures that the style works equally well for contemporary or traditional landscapes."

While a symmetrical and evenly spaced pathway will pair nicely with a manicured yard, it doesn't have to be perfect. Mixing different-sized and -shaped slabs will create the illusion of a naturally made pathway, which is also trending.

2. Crushed stone
Photo by Matthew Cunningham Landscape Design LLC 

Want to create a beautiful walkway but don't have the time for a big project? Consider using the ever-so-trendy crushed stone.

"It's loose, has lots of texture, and produces great sound when traversing," explains Michael McGown, senior landscape architect at KAA Design Group. "It speaks to casual informality, and lets the plantings define the path."

Not only does crushed stone look nice, it's also easy on your wallet andMother Nature. The total cost will vary based on the pathway, but a 50-pound bag of crushed stones can cost less than $40.

"It's very inexpensive, so replacing existing hardscape is probably within the means of a typical homeowner or home buyer," McGown says.

And it's eco-friendly: Crushed stones are more permeable than, say, a slab of concrete, so the water and grass underneath your pathway will still be watered and nourished, McGowan adds.

3. Reclaimed brick
Photo by The Design Build Co.

As the saying goes, one man's trash is another man's treasure—and the world of hardscaping is no exception. Specifically, McGowan says, reclaimed brick is having a moment.

"Reclaimed brick [has] color and texture," he explains. "It’s got a natural patina and looks authentic and timeless. [Bricks] blur the line between contemporary and traditional."

Don't get us wrong, we love a freshly paved sidewalk as much as the next person; however, there's something cozy and inviting about reclaimed materials.

4. Sustainable sidewalks
Hailshadow/iStock

Installing solar panels and planting trees are two obvious steps toward sustainability, but did you know you can apply the same eco-friendly ethos to your hardscaping?

“I’ve always been engaged in working sustainably, so seeing more options and materials coming forward in the past few years is really exciting,” Azevedo says. “Sustainable hardscaping materials are produced in a way that is least damaging to the environment and allow water to penetrate the ground.”

While Azevedo points to urbanite (aka repurposed concrete) and recycled granite as suitable alternatives, he encourages homeowners to think outside the cinder block.

“Crushed seashells, particularly mollusk shells, which have been a burden on landfills in recent years, make an excellent ground cover for paths, or as acidity-controlling mulch for flower beds,” he says.

5. Luxurious limestone
Photo by Hutker Architects 

All of the architectural greats feature limestone: the Pentagon, the Empire State Building, and, now, your walkway. While crushed stone and brick are suitable materials for your hardscape, they give your property a very specific look and feel. Limestone, on the other hand, is versatile enough to be a blank canvas so you can let your yard's foliage take center stage.

It "can provide elegance to either" contemporary or traditional style, McGowan explains.

And unlike brick, which has a predetermined shape, you can cut limestone any way you'd like. So whether you want a straight sidewalk or something with more curve, this is one material that can get the job done.

Contact The McLeod Group Network for all your Real Estate needs! 971.208.5093 or [email protected]

By: Realtor.com, Kelsey Mulvey

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The McLeod Group Network
Keller Williams Capital City
1900 Hines St SE #220
Salem OR 97302
971-208-5093
Fax: 971-599-5229

**Disclaimer: Amy McLeod, and her team, do not initiate, process, or service mortgages.  And provide this information only as a service.  You should confirm information here with your Licensed Mortgage Lender.